FRANKFORT — As Kentuckians prepare to celebrate one of the country’s most popular holidays, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) is reminding motorists to plan for a designated driver before the St. Patrick’s Day party begins.

 

“If you know you are going to drink, plan a ride ahead of time,” said KOHS Executive Director Dr. Noelle Hunter. “Alcohol not only dangerously impairs your driving skills – it impairs your judgment. Don’t wait until you’ve been drinking to find a sober driver.”

 

Tragically, St. Patrick’s Day has become one of the nation’s deadliest holidays. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 25 percent of the fatal crashes that occurred last year during the St. Patrick’s Day holiday involved drunken drivers.

 

“With all the sober ride options available, there is never an excuse for driving after drinking,” said Hunter.

 

According to NHTSA, on average, one person is killed every 53 minutes in a drunk-driving crash in the United States. Last year, more than 16 percent of fatalities on Kentucky roadways were due to a drunken driver.

 

To prevent roadway tragedies from occurring, the KOHS recommends the following:

 

• Before the festivities begin, plan a way to get home safely at the end of the night.

 

• Before drinking, designate a sober driver and leave your car keys at home.

 

• If you are impaired, use a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation or your local sober ride program.

 

• Download the free “Drive Sober Kentucky” application for information on local taxi services and sober ride programs. Visit www.drivesoberky.com for more information.

 

• If you see a drunken driver, contact law enforcement. Safely pull off the road and utilize the one-touch dial feature through the “Drive Sober Kentucky” app. The call will be received at the nearest Kentucky State Police post. Callers will remain anonymous and should give a description of the vehicle, location, direction of travel and license number if possible.

 

• If you know people who are about to drive while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements.

 

“Please have a safe and happy St. Patrick’s Day,” said Hunter. “All we ask is that you celebrate responsibly.”

Friday, March 17, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) is observing National Endometriosis Awareness Month during March.

 

Endometriosis occurs when the tissue lining the uterus grows outside of the uterus on other areas in the body. In the United States, there are an estimated 6.5 million women with endometriosis and others who have the condition but are unaware due to having no symptoms.

 

“Endometriosis occurs from the abnormal attachment of endometrial glands outside of the uterus, which can result in chronic inflammation of the surrounding area from the irritation of its irregular placement,” said PMC Obstetrician/Gynecologist Tiffany Thompson, DO. “One of the most challenging gynecologic conditions a woman may encounter within her life is endometriosis. It occurs in approximately 6-10 percent of women, and the disorder can be a leading source of chronic pelvic pain and infertility.”

 

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with a woman’s menstrual period and although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual pain that’s far worse than usual according to Mayo Clinic.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health (OWH) states that other symptoms include bleeding or spotting between menstrual periods, infertility and/or stomach (digestive) problems.

 

“Those individuals with endometriosis may first notice increased pain with menstrual cycles or discomfort within the pelvis,” added Dr. Thompson.

 

According to the OWH women are more likely to get endometriosis if they have never had children, their menstrual periods last more than seven days, they have short menstrual cycles that are 27 days or fewer, a family member has endometriosis such as their mother, aunt and/or sister or they have a health problem that blocks the normal flow of menstrual blood from their body during their menstrual period.

 

Although there is no cure for endometriosis, if a woman is experiencing symptoms she should speak with her physician about treatment options to help manage these symptoms and any other issues related to the condition.

 

“Patients require an examination with a gynecologist for appropriate diagnosis,” Dr. Thompson said. “Depending on age and clinical status, there are many medical and surgical options available to help improve the quality of life for a woman with endometriosis.”

 

For more information or to schedule a physician appointment, call 606-218-2207.

 

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health, Mayo Clinic

Author Name: 
Melinda Goodson
Friday, March 17, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) recognizes the professionals working in Pulmonary Rehabilitation during Pulmonary Rehabilitation Week, March 12–18.

 

The PMC Pulmonary Rehabilitation program is for people diagnosed with a chronic lung disease that causes shortness of breath resulting in a reduction in their ability to perform daily tasks.

 

The team of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Specialists includes Sonya Simpson, Dee Smith and Jessica Senters who are trained specifically in pulmonary diseases. This team provides education and coaching with each patient to improve breathing and physical endurance which increases their daily activity level.

 

“Our Pulmonary Rehabilitation program here at PMC is rewarding for our community of patients who are challenged by different pulmonary diseases. It improves their quality of life through education and socialization. This is evident by how many of our patients continue with a maintenance program once they have completed the first phase,” said Deborah Pilkins, director of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

 

People suffering from asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, black lung, bronchiectasis, pulmonary hypertension or any other chronic pulmonary conditions would benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation.

 

“The patients are welcomed and encouraged by the pulmonary rehabilitation staff,” Pilkins added. “They are not alone in this journey which starts with the first phone call to the patient from our office assistant, Sheila King. Each one of the staff members plays an important role in the success of the program.

 

In order to qualify for the program, patients must be non-smokers or be willing to participate in a smoking cessation program.

 

“The most rewarding part about this program is the relationship we build with our patients,” said Pulmonary Rehabilitation Specialist Jessica Senters.

 

“Our goal is to continue to help patients better manage symptoms of shortness of breath and make pulmonary rehab a beneficial and enjoyable experience,” added Specialist Sonya Simpson.

 

For more information on Pulmonary Rehabilitation at Pikeville Medical Center, call 606-218-6222.

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, March 17, 2017

Pikeville Elementary School (PES) continued its academic excellence on the state level earlier this month.

 

The PES Academic Team captured its fifth straight championship and is the only school in the region to achieve the feat.

 

All PES students advanced from district to region and onto the state level.

 

The team competed in the state competition at John’s Creek Elementary School on March 4, where two fifth-grade students, Clinton Goff and Aneesh Sharma earned the highest scores possible on the state level with a perfect 30/30.

 

Clinton’s scores came in Social Studies and Aneesh in Science during the finals.

 

Clinton also received a first-place ribbon for his participation on the PES quick recall team. This is the second year in a row he has won first place in both awards.

 

Aneesh won first place in Mathematics and received the second highest score in the state. Last year, Aneesh was the youngest participant to place first in the region.

 

The team is made up of dedicated, hardworking fourth and fifth graders. The group is led by head coach Kim Fields.

 

She is assisted by Jeff Akers, Betty McGuire, Jane Pruitt and Markayla Stevens.

 

“I am very proud of them. They have worked extremely hard and are very dedicated individuals,” Fields said.

 

Other first place winners included Cady Cooley, Language Arts; and Aastha Patel, Arts and Humanities.

 

“The coach obviously works hard with the students, as do the students work equally hard. This is the fifth year in a row that our school has won first place for five straight years – that says something,” PES Principal Robert Jones said. “The students work hard, study hard, and without the help of volunteers this would not be possible.”

 

The following PES students placed in the state competition:

 

Noah Howie, Mathematics; Hibba Mansoor, Science; Andrew Deskins, Social Studies; Eli Tan, Language Arts; Alayna Varney, Arts and Humanities; Kylie Brandt, Composition and Cameron Jones, Composition.

ACADEMIC TEAM: Left to Right: Jonah Adkins, Cady Cooley, Andrew Bentley, Rylee Theiss, Indigo Schnopp-Wyatt, Aneesh Sharma, Andrew Deskins, Hibba Mansoor, Kylie Brandt, Olivia Williamson, Eli Tan, Isabella Mulkey, Noah Howie, Assistant Coach Jeff Akers, Allara Parsons, Aastha Patel, Alayna Varney, Coach Kim Fields, Clinton Goff, Assistant Coach Markayla Stevens, Tate Fields and Assistant Coach Betty McGuire. Team Members Not Pictured are Cameron Jones, Aidan Cassady and Clayton Thornbury.
Medical Leader | SUBMITTED PHOTO
Friday, March 17, 2017

Daniel Fusco’s book “Honestly” reminded me that the whole is bigger and greater than the individual parts.

 

“A set of brakes is good, but brakes are even better when they’re part of a car. A (skilled) first baseman is good, but even better when he’s part of a baseball team. We are designed to be part of something greater, something bigger, and something more beautiful than any individual could ever be alone.”

 

That is true not only in the church but in life as well. Paul expresses it, “…for not one of us lives for himself, and not one dies for himself” (Rom14:7).

 

The poet John Donne reinforces it, “No man is an island entire of itself… because I am involved in mankind.”

 

We are in life together and need the care and support of each other and give care and support to each other.

 

 

 

 

 

~ PMC Chaplain Sam Crawford may be reached at 606-218-3969.

Friday, March 17, 2017

The Leonard Lawson Cancer Center (LLCC) at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) acknowledges March as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the US and the second leading cause in men.

 

The death rate for colorectal cancer has been dropping in both men and women for several decades.  There are a number of likely reasons for this change. 

 

One is that colorectal polyps are now being found more often by screening and removed before they can develop into cancers or are being found earlier when the disease is easier to treat. Treatment has also improved over the last few decades resulting in more than one million survivors of colorectal cancer in the US.

 

“If the patient can be operated on, surgery can get most, if not all, of the cancer,” said PMC Oncologist Gayle Roberts, MD. “This depends on the size of the tumor and how many lymph nodes test positive.”

 

If you have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, your cancer care team will discuss treatment options with you. There are several ways to treat colorectal cancer, depending on its type and stage.

 

“Colon Cancer has a fair prognosis depending on the size of the tumor and progression of the disease,” said Dr. Roberts.  “Sometimes surgery alone is enough. When there is a risk of cancer affecting the entire intestinal tract, chemotherapy is necessary to rid the body of the cancer.”

 

Dr. Roberts encourages patients to always focus on healthy life choices.

 

“Smoking is one of the biggest causative cofactors of colon cancer,” he said. “After diagnosis, it is never too late to change your habits. A good diet, exercise and stopping tobacco consumption are ways to minimize risk.”

 

For additional information about colorectal cancer or to schedule an appointment call the Leonard Lawson Cancer Center at 606-218-2212.

 

 

 

Source: American Cancer Society

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, March 17, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) proudly announces the addition of Hospital Medicine Physician Megan Copley-Harris, DO.

 

Dr. Copley-Harris received her bachelor of science in biology from Georgetown College and her medical degree from Pikeville College School of Osteopathic medicine.

 

“I always had an interest in the human body and how it worked. I knew at an early age I wanted to practice medicine and pursue my dream of taking care of people,” she said.

 

She grew up in Martin County and is the daughter of a coal miner.

 

“I grew up knowing this area needed doctors and I knew I wanted to practice medicine in this area,” she said.

 

She looks forward to providing care to the people in this area.

 

“My goals are to treat patients like I would treat my own family by providing quality care for them and communicating with their families,” she said.

 

Several factors drew her to PMC

 

“I chose PMC for a few different reasons,” she said. “I wanted to provide care to people of eastern Kentucky. PMC is a great environment to work in. I have such a wonderful relationship with the staff here. PMC offers many specialties for patients to receive quality care,” she said.

 

When she’s not caring for patients, Dr. Copley-Harris enjoys spending time with her husband, Lee and their son Ronan. As a family, they enjoy traveling and taking vacations and making family memories.

Author Name: 
Amanda Jo Lawson
Friday, March 17, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Pikeville High School senior Ryan Crum, son of Dr. Aaron and Angela Crum, has earned one of only 150 Coca Cola Scholars Program scholarships worth $20,000.

 

The Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship is an achievement-based scholarship awarded to graduating high school seniors.

 

Students are recognized for their capacity to lead and serve, as well as their commitment to making a significant impact on their schools and communities.

 

With the 28th class in 2016, the Foundation has provided over 5,700 Coca-Cola Scholars with more than $60 million in educational support. 150 Coca-Cola Scholars are selected each year to receive this $20,000 scholarship.

 

Reaching this level distinguishes these students as extraordinary leaders in their school and community.

 

Nearly 86,000 applicants and more than 1,900 Semifinalists participated in the program across the nation.

 

Regional Finalists then participated in the next phase of the selection process, a 20-minute interview with a Regional Interview Committee, comprised of a Foundation staff member and previous Coca-Cola Scholars Program scholarship recipients.

 

After these interviews, 150 students were named Coca-Cola Scholars and received a $20,000 college scholarship.

 

These 150 Coca-Cola Scholars will attend the 2017 Scholars Weekend April 20-23, 2017, where they will meet their peers for a time of inspiration, fun, and camaraderie. Scholars will be honored at the 29th annual Scholars Banquet and participate in a Leadership Development Institute, an intensive leadership training during Scholars Weekend that challenges them to develop an inside-out leadership philosophy.

 

The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation supports more than 1,400 college students each year, with prestigious annual scholarships of $3.4 million through two nationally recognized programs on behalf of the Coca-Cola System.

 

 

Ryan Crum
Friday, March 17, 2017

LEXINGTON — Perry County Central opened the second half on an 8-0 run and pulled away to beat cold-shooting Pikeville, 61-46, in the opening round of the Boys’ Sweet 16 tournament played at Rupp Arena on March 15.

 

The Panthers, who finished the year at 23-9, hit just 16-of-52 shots from the floor for 30 percent and were soundly beaten on the boards by a 44-21 margin by the much taller Commodores.

 

Cade Byers led the Panthers in scoring with eight points while Wyatt Battaile chipped in seven.

 

Byers jumper with 4 minutes, 1 second left before halftime gave Pikeville its final lead of the game at 14-12.

 

Princewell Anosike led the Commodores, now 28-7, with 10 points, 15 rebounds and six blocked shots.

 

Damon Tobler and Austin Hill paced the scoring with 12 points apiece. Idris Akenyemi chipped in 10.

 

Pikeville was playing in its first state tournament since 1999.

 

 

 

At Lexington

 

(Sweet 16)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PC (28-7)........................................................8 15 17 21 - 61

 

PK (23-9)........................................................9 11 7 19 - 46

 

Scoring:

 

Perry County Central (61) - Damon Tobler 3(1) 3-7 12; Idris Akenyemi 5 0-0 10; Noah Back 0(3) 0-0 9; Austin Hill 6 0-0 12; Princewell Anosike 4 2-5 10; Chandler Caudill 2 0-1 4; Jacob Woolum 1 0-0 2; and Noah Caudill 0 2-2 2. Totals: 21(4) 7-15 61.

 

Pikeville (46) - Kyle Watkins 1 2-2 4; Wyatt Battaile 1(1) 2-5 7; Evan Rhodes 3 0-0 6; Connor Roberts 1(1) 0-0 5; Cade Byers 4 0-1 8; Jose Childers 0(1) 0-0 3; Grayson Harris 0 2-2 2; Connor Risner 1 3-4 5; Kobe Brown 0 2-2 2; and Zach Hamilton 2 0-1 4. Totals: 13(3) 11-17 46.

 

Next up: Pikeville’s season ends at 23-9.

Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, March 17, 2017

ROBINSON CREEK — Shelby Valley made the most of four hits as the Wildcats opened the season with an 11-1 win over Ridgeview (Va.) in a game played at Dale Trivette Field on March 13.

 

Ty Riddle singled, scored and drove in two runs to back the pitching of winner Jacob Beverly.

 

Seth Bailey walked three times and scored three runs while Austin Rhodes singled, scored and added an RBI.

 

Beverly stuck out 10 batters and scattered three hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Robinson Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

RG (0-1)…..................................100 00 – 1-3-2

 

SV (1-0)…...................................011 54 – 11-4-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Jacob Beverly

 

LP –

 

Hitting: Ty Riddle 1b, 1r, 2 RBI; Seth Bailey 3-bb, 3r; Austin Rhodes 1b, 1r, 1 RBI, Shelby Valley.

 

 

 

Pike Central…….......................5

 

Sheldon Clark…........................2

 

BUCKLEYS CREEK — Pike Central’s Brice Elkins had two hits and Evan Coleman doubled and drove in a pair of runs to lead the Hawks to a 5-2 win over Sheldon Clark in a game played at the Hawks Nest on March 13.

 

Ryan Eads was the winning pitcher with relief help from Seth Conn, who had one hit and drove in one run.

 

Ethan Osborne took the loss for Sheldon Clark.

 

 

 

At Buckleys Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

SC (0-1)…...............................000 100 1 – 2-2-3

 

PC (1-1)…..............................111 002 x – 5-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Ryan Eads

 

LP – Ethan Osborne

 

Hitting: Evan Coleman 2b. 2 RBI; Brice Elkins 2-1b, 2r; Austin Smith 2r; Seth Conn 1b, 1 RBI, Pike Central.

 

 

 

North Laurel…..........................8

 

Letcher Central......................…4

 

ERMINE — Letcher Central fell behind early on to North Laurel and the Cougars came up short in an 8-4 loss on March 11.

 

Keaston Maggard drove in three runs for the Cougars and teammate Jake Slone added three hits in the season-opening loss.

 

John Potter took the loss.

 

Alex Binder had three hits to back the pitching of winner Jared Gay.

 

 

 

At Ermine

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

NL (1-0)…............................221 102 0 – 8-11-0

 

LC (0-1).............................…000 400 0 – 4-12-3

 

By TEDDY PAYNTER

 

Staff Writer

 

 

 

ROBINSON CREEK — Shelby Valley made the most of four hits as the Wildcats opened the season with an 11-1 win over Ridgeview (Va.) in a game played at Dale Trivette Field on March 13.

 

Ty Riddle singled, scored and drove in two runs to back the pitching of winner Jacob Beverly.

 

Seth Bailey walked three times and scored three runs while Austin Rhodes singled, scored and added an RBI.

 

Beverly stuck out 10 batters and scattered three hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Robinson Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

RG (0-1)…..................................100 00 – 1-3-2

 

SV (1-0)…...................................011 54 – 11-4-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Jacob Beverly

 

LP –

 

Hitting: Ty Riddle 1b, 1r, 2 RBI; Seth Bailey 3-bb, 3r; Austin Rhodes 1b, 1r, 1 RBI, Shelby Valley.

 

 

 

Pike Central…….......................5

 

Sheldon Clark…........................2

 

BUCKLEYS CREEK — Pike Central’s Brice Elkins had two hits and Evan Coleman doubled and drove in a pair of runs to lead the Hawks to a 5-2 win over Sheldon Clark in a game played at the Hawks Nest on March 13.

 

Ryan Eads was the winning pitcher with relief help from Seth Conn, who had one hit and drove in one run.

 

Ethan Osborne took the loss for Sheldon Clark.

 

 

 

At Buckleys Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

SC (0-1)…...............................000 100 1 – 2-2-3

 

PC (1-1)…..............................111 002 x – 5-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Ryan Eads

 

LP – Ethan Osborne

 

Hitting: Evan Coleman 2b. 2 RBI; Brice Elkins 2-1b, 2r; Austin Smith 2r; Seth Conn 1b, 1 RBI, Pike Central.

 

 

 

North Laurel…..........................8

 

Letcher Central......................…4

 

ERMINE — Letcher Central fell behind early on to North Laurel and the Cougars came up short in an 8-4 loss on March 11.

 

Keaston Maggard drove in three runs for the Cougars and teammate Jake Slone added three hits in the season-opening loss.

 

John Potter took the loss.

 

Alex Binder had three hits to back the pitching of winner Jared Gay.

 

 

 

At Ermine

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

NL (1-0)…............................221 102 0 – 8-11-0

 

LC (0-1).............................…000 400 0 – 4-12-3

 

Phelps in the season opener for both teams on March 9.

 

Hayden Fleming and Coty Wright each added an RBI to back the pitching of winner Mathew Jessey.

 

 

 

At Phelps

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

JK (1-0)…...............................000 220 0 – 4-4-3

 

PH (0-1)…..............................100 200 0 – 3-2-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Matthew Jessey

 

LP – Dylan New

 

Hitting: Josh Delph 1h, 2 RBI; Coty Wright 1h, 1 RBI; Hayden Fleming 1 RBI, Jenkins.

 

 

 

Pikeville………..........................2

 

Paintsville……….......................1

 

PIKEVILLE — Winning pitcher Peyton Hamilton scored on a wild pitch and second baseman Andrew McNamee knocked home the game-winning run on a fielder’s choice as Pikeville edged Paintsville, 2-1, in the season opener played at Davis Park on March 8.

 

Jonathon McKenzie took the loss despite allowing only one hit.

 

Hamilton scattered four hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Pikeville

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

PV (0-1)…..............................100 000 0 – 1-5-0

 

PK (1-0)…..............................200 000 x – 2-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Peyton Hamilton

 

LP – Jonathon McKenzie

 

Hitting: Matt Baldwin 2b; Seth Williams 1b, 1r; Jonathon McKenzie 1b, 1 RBI, Paintsville. Andrew McNamee 2b, 1b, 1 RBI; Peyton Hamilton 1b, 1r, Pikeville.

OPENING DAY: Paintsville catcher Chase Meade blocks a pitch in the dirt to Pikeville’s Andrew McNamee during a game played at Davis Park on March. 8. McNamee had two hits and drove in the game-winning run as the Panthers edged the Tigers, 2-1.
Medical Leader│Photo by TEDDY PAYNTER
Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, March 17, 2017

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