According to the World Health Organization, there are 1.1 million smokers worldwide, which constitutes one-third of the global population, age 15 years and above. Of these, 800 million (73 percent) are in developing countries. Globally, three million deaths occur every year due to tobacco use. It has been estimated that without urgent interventions mortality due to tobacco use will rise to 10 million every year over the next 30 to 40 years; 70 percent of which will occur in developing nations. The death rate is three times higher in smokers than non-smokers of all ages.

 

Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 chemicals including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide (CO), methoprene, propylene glycol, benzopyrene, butane, cadmium, acetone, ammonia, lead, benzene and formaldehyde. Forty of the chemicals found are known carcinogens. Tobacco consumption has far reaching health consequences. Adolescent beginners have a 50 percent lifetime chance of dying from tobacco related diseases. Acute health risks include dyspnoea, tachycardia, hypertension, exacerbation of asthma, impotence, infertility and an increase in blood CO levels. Long-term health risks include coronary artery disease, stroke and cardio obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of developing certain cancers is also increased. These include cancer of the lungs, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, cervix and leukemia.

 

Those who smoke not only harm themselves, but also those around them by secondhand smoke. Among children, sudden infant death, respiratory illness, middle ear disease, gum and tooth disease and exacerbation of asthma are common from exposure to secondhand smoke. Among adults, lung cancer and heart disease are known to occur. Measured breath CO levels of non-smoking people exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were higher among waiters in hotels/restaurants/bars, compared to others. The average breath CO levels were also significantly higher in ETS-exposed people suffering from respiratory diseases compared to normal people.

 

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Each year it kills more than 440,000 Americans and about 8.6 million people in the United States have illnesses attributed to smoking. In addition, direct medical costs related to smoking total about $75 billion annually. The adverse health effects of cigarette smoking and the benefits of quitting are well documented and widely known to the general public.

 

Stopping smoking is associated with lowered risk for lung cancer and many other types of cancer. Other health benefits include reduced risk for heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease (narrowing of the blood vessels outside the heart), and reduced risk of heart disease with one to two years of quitting. Another benefit is reduced respiratory symptoms, such as coughing wheezing and shortness of breath. While these symptoms may not disappear, they do not continue to progress at the same rate among people who quit compared to those who continue to smoke. Quitting smoking also reduces the risk of developing other lung diseases such as COPD, the leading cause of death in the United States.

 

For women who wish to become pregnant, quitting smoking reduces the risk of infertility in women of childbearing age. Women who stop smoking during pregnancy also reduce the risk of having a baby with low birth weight.

 

— Dr. Asim Kichloo is a hospitalist for Pikeville Medical Center

 
EDITOR’S NOTE: Pikeville Medical Center offers free smoking cessation classes every Thursday at 6pm at the Leonard Lawson Cancer Center. For more information or to sign up for the class, call 606-218-4682.

Friday, February 24, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Girl Scouts’ Founder Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low began the program over 100 years ago.

 

She believed in the power of every girl. Today, there are nearly three million Girl Scouts in 92 countries and 800,000 adult members who work primarily as volunteers. Girl Scouts has grown into a global movement with more than 59 million alumnae.

 

Low envisioned an organization that would prepare girls to meet their world with courage, confidence and character. She organized the first Girl Scout troop on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., and every year since, Girl Scouts has made her vision a reality, helping girls discover their strengths, passions and talents.

 

Girl Scouts is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls.

 

Here is a breakdown of the levels girls can become involved in:

 

•Daisies, grades K – 1, gain new friends as part of a troop, earn petals, make a difference in the community and explore nature and the outdoors.

 

•Brownies, grades 2 – 3, expand her circle of friends in a troop, earn badges, explore nature and outdoors, and participate in community projects.

 

•Juniors, grades 4 -5, try new experiences and learn new skills while earning badges, explore the outdoors at camp and beyond, and earn a Bronze Award – the first of Girl Scouts’ highest awards.

 

•Cadettes, grades 6 – 8, explore the outdoors, earn a Silver Award – the highest award a Cadette can earn, try new experiences and learn new skills while earning badges and gain confidence while mentoring younger Girl Scouts.

 

•Seniors, grades 9 – 10, go on an adventure and travel, be a positive role model, mentor younger girls, develop better friendships, join together to tackle an important international issue and explore careers in a variety of fields.

 

•Ambassadors, grades 11 – 12, implement a take action program and become eligible for college scholarships, join a crew of likeminded girls at a World Center, work with younger Girl Scouts to build a rain garden and help protect the environment, enhance relationship skills, problem-solving abilities and knowledge of science and technology.

 

The Girl Scout Cookie Program is an important part of the overall Girl Scout experience, all girl scouts participate in the program by learning goal setting, decision making, public speaking and much more.

Author Name: 
Abigail Gibson
Friday, February 24, 2017

BETSY LAYNE — South Floyd knew they would have a battle on their hands with Prestonsburg.

 

The Raiders, who had five players foul out, gutted out a heart-wrenching 79-76 win over the Blackcats in double overtime to reach the finals of the 58th District tournament being played at D.W. Howard Fieldhouse.

 

Brady Conn finished with a game-high 27 points to lead four Raiders (19-12) in double-figure scoring. Jacob Collins added 15, J.R. Tackett tallied 12 and Shane Kidd tossed in 11.

 

Blake Slone paced the Blackcats, who finished 7-24, with 26 points and Austin Endicott added 23. Chandler Nelson chipped in 13.

 

 

 

At Betsy Layne

 

(58th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PB (7-24)…......................................…13 18 12 15 (13) (5) – 76

 

SF (19-12)….........................................10 19 16 13 (13) (8) – 79

 

Scoring:

 

Prestonsburg (76) – Drake Nunnery 1 7-10 9; Chandler Nelson 4(1) 2-8 13; Wes Hager 0 4-6 4; Austin Endicott 5(2) 7-13 23; Blake Slone 13 0-0 26; and Adam Slone 0 1-2 1. Totals: 23(3) 21-39 76.

 

South Floyd (79) – Shane Kidd 1(2) 3-4 11; Jacob Collins 4(2) 1-5 15; Brady Conn 10 7-14 27; J.R. Tackett 3 6-6 12; Blake Johnson 2 0-0 4; Kyle Isaac 291) 2-2 9; and Dalton Boyd 0 1-2 1. Totals: 22(5) 20-33 79.

 

 

 

53rd District Tournament

 

Letcher Central….....................................66

 

Cordia…………….......................................57

 

HINDMAN — Letcher Central took the lead away from Cordia in the final quarter and held on for a 66-57 win in the 53rd District tournament played at Knott County Central High School on Feb. 21.

 

The Cougars, now 22-8, secured a berth in the 14th Region tournament next week while the Lions finished 13-11.

 

Torrell Carter fired in a game-high 29 points and Austin Caudill added 15.

 

Oumar Keita paced the Lions with 19 points.

 

 

 

At Hindman

 

(53rd District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

LC (22-8)…..........................................................10 13 18 25 – 66

 

CR (13-11)..........................................................…9 16 16 16 – 57

 

Scoring:

 

Letcher Central (66) – Torrell Carter 9 11-17 29; Austin Caudill 1(2) 7-8 15; Austin Banks 1(1) 2-2 7; Elijah Raglin 2 2-4 6; and Gregory Kincer 2 5-6 9. Totals: 15(3) 27-39 66.

 

Cordia (57) – Dandre Reed 1(1) 0-0 5; Kareem McDonald 2(3) 4-6 17; Marquis Frazier 3 4-6 10; Malik Henry 3 0-2 6; and Oumar Keita 7(1) 2-2 19. Totals: 16(5) 10-16 57.

 

 

 

57th District Tournament

 

Johnson Central……..................................77

 

Paintsville…………....................................61

 

SALYERSVILLE — Johnson Central built a commanding lead against Paintsville and cruised to a 77-61 win in the 57th District Tournament opener played at Magoffin County High School on Feb. 21.

 

The Golden Eagles, now 24-6, landed four players in double-figure scoring as they clinched a berth in next week’s 15th Region tournament.

 

Cole Crace tossed in 17 points while Mason Blair added 12. Austin Davis and Jacob Rice chipped in 10 apiece.

 

Seth Williams took game-high scoring honors for the Tigers (8-20) with 26 points.

 

 

 

At Salyersville

 

(57th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PV (8-20)…............................................................13 13 5 30 – 61

 

JC (24-6)….............................................................28 21 15 13 – 77

 

Scoring:

 

Paintsville (61) – Trent Vanover 0(2) 0-0 6; Seth Williams 4(5) 3-4 26; James Allen 0 2-2 2; Mason Moore 2(1) 2-4 9; Braxton Tharp 1 2-2 4; Ethan Hensley 1 0-0 2; Michael Prater 0(1) 2-2 5; Brandon Richmond 2 1-2 5; and Ryan Moore 1 0-0 2. Totals: 11(9) 12-18 61.

 

Johnson Central (77) – Leon Moshefy 2 2-4 6; Austin Davis 1(2) 2-2 10; Cole Crace 2(3) 4-4 17; Mason Blair 2(2) 2-3 12; Jacob Rice 2(2) 0-0 10; Caleb Price 1 0-0 2; Dalton Collins 1 1-2 3; Blake Delong 2 0-0 4; Gabe Ferral 0(1) 0-2 3; Isaiah May 0 3-4 3; and Cory VanHoose 1 0-2 2. Totals: 15(11) 14-23 77.

 

 

 

REGULAR SEASON

 

Tug Valley……...........................82

 

Man……………..........................46

 

MAN, W.Va. — Tug Valley dominated from start to finish as the Panthers rolled past Man, 82-46, in a game played at Man Memorial Fieldhouse on Feb. 21.

 

Tyler May poured in a game-high 34 points and Garret Brown added 21 as Tug Valley improved to 13-8.

 

Jackson Porter had 11 for the Hillbillies, now 0-21.

 

 

 

At Man, W.Va.

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

TV (13-8)…........................................................…28 22 28 4 – 82

 

MN (0-21)…….......................................................6 12 11 17 – 46

 

Scoring:

 

Tug Valley (82) – Bryson Preece 2 0-0 4; Tyler May 2(10) 0-0 34; Brady Spaulding 1 0-0 2; Ethan Varney 0 2-2 2; Garret Brown 3(5) 0-2 21; Andrew Evans 0(1) 0-0 3; Colby Savage 1 1-2 3; and Mason Layne 4 5-6 13. Totals: 13(16) 8-12 82.

 

Man (46) – Trey Whitt 2(1) 2-3 9; Cutler Workman 2(2) 0-0 10; Matt Spaulding 0 2-2 2; Nathan Mitchell 0(1) 3-8 6; Jacob Frazier 2 0-0 4; Trace Fekete 1 0-0 2; Jackson Porter 1(3) 0-0 11; and Quentin Moody 1 0-0 2. Totals: 9(7) 7-13 46.

 

 

 

GIRLS

 

59th District Tournament

 

Shelby Valley……......................................77

 

Piarist School…….....................................21

 

PIKEVILLE – Shelby Valley dominated from the opening tip against Piarist School as the Lady Kats rolled to a 77-21 win in the 59th District girls’ tournament opener played at T.W. Oliver Memorial Gymnasium on Feb. 21.

 

The Lady Kats, now 25-4, advanced to the championship game against Pikeville. Both teams will move on the 15th Region tournament next week.

 

Summer Rose and Alyssa Elswick poured in a game-high 13 each and Cassidi Wright followed with 11.

 

Lauren Wright and Katie Howard scored nine each for the Lady Knights, who finished the season 3-24.

 

 

 

At Pikeville

 

(59th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PS (3-24)….............................................................6 6 6 3 – 21

 

SV (25-4)…...........................................................26 24 17 10 – 77

 

Scoring:

 

Piarist School (21) – Katie Howard 9; Lauren Wright 9; and Kennedy Bowen 3.

 

Shelby Valley (77) – Cassidi Wright 1(3) 0-0 11; Kyleigh Tackett 2 0-0 4; Alex Stanley 2 0-0 4; Cassidy Rowe 2(1) 0-0 7; Summer Rose 6 1-2 13; Kayla Newsom 2 0-0 4; Laci Johnson 0(1) 0-0 3; Tori Hampton 1 3-3 5; Kylie Hall 2 0-0 4; Makayla Gillispie 1 0-0 2; Alyssa Elswick 6 1-2 13; and Kaitlyn Adkins 2(1) 0-0 7. Totals: 27(6) 5-6 77.

 

 

 

Class AA, Region 4,

 

Section 2 Tournament

 

Mingo Central..........................................48

 

Lincoln County..........................................42

 

CHAPMANVILLE, W.Va. — Mingo Central jumped out to an early lead against Lincoln County and went on to score a 58-42 win in the opening round of the Class AA, Region 4, Section 2 girls’ tournament played at Chapmanville Regional High School on Feb. 21.

 

Xziah Rhodes poured in a game-high 19 points and Tyshira Joplin added 18 as the Lady Miners improved to 17-6. Katie Ball added 13.

 

McKendra Wiley led the Lady Panthers, who finished 14-10, with 18 points.

 

 

 

At Chapmanville

 

(Class AA, Region 4 Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

LC (14-10)…............................................................8 1 18 15 – 42

 

MC (17-6)…...........................................................19 10 6 23 – 58

 

Scoring:

 

Lincoln County (42) – McKendra Wiley 18; Carly McComas 14; Lydia Roberts 6; Alyssa Adkins 2; and Rachel Pennington 2.

 

Mingo Central (58) – Xziah Rhodes 19; Tyshira Joplin 18; Katie Ball 13; Kylee Varney 4; Mikazia Rhodes 2; Zoe Evans 1; and Maliyah Martin 1.

 

 

 

60th District Tournament

 

Lawrence County..................................….46

 

Belfry……………….....................................41

 

LOUISA — Belfry was bounced from the 60th District girls’ tournament as Lawrence County edged the lady Pirates, 46-41, in a game played on Feb. 20

 

Hannah Rucker and Lexi Ratliff tossed in 15 points apiece as the Lady Bulldogs (10-20) secured a spot in the upcoming 15th Region tournament.

 

Lena Hairston tossed in a game-high 17 points as Belfry’s season ends at 15-14.

 

 

 

At Louisa

 

(60th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

BF (15-14)…..................................................…9 10 9 13 – 41

 

LC (10-20)….................................................…8 9 13 16 – 46

 

Scoring:

 

Belfry (41) – Lena Hairston 3(2) 5-6 17; Kenzie Keene 4 0-4 8; McKenzie Maynard 2 0-0 4; Ariel Mounts 0(1) 0-0 3; Linzee Phillips 1 0-0 2; and Kailee Rash 2(1) 0-2 7. Totals: 12(4) 5-12 41.

 

Lawrence County (46) – Hannah Rucker 15; Kelly Davis 9; Kylie Maynard 3; Lexi Ratliff 15; Chelsey Fields 2; and Kassidi Cavins 2. Totals: 11(3) 15-23 46.

 

 

 

See additional tournament games online at medicalleader.org

PRESSURE: Piarist School’s Lauren Wright (22) passes the ball as Shelby Valley’s Cassidi Wright defends on the play.
Medical Leader│Photo by TEDDY PAYNTER
Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, February 24, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Shelby Valley punched a ticket to the 15th Region boys’ tournament with a heart-stopping 37-36 win over East Ridge in the 59th District tournament game played at T.W. Oliver Memorial Gymnasium on Feb. 22.

 

The Wildcats, now 16-13, was led by Blake Burke’s game-high 17 points. Tanner Bentley added eight.

 

Michael Conn paced the Warriors, who finished 19-11, with 12 points. Chris Bevins chipped in nine.

 

Valley will play Pikeville in the finals tonight.

 

 

 

At Pikeville

 

(59th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

SV (16-13)…................................8 8 11 10 – 37

 

ER (19-11)…................................5 10 12 9 – 36

 

Scoring:

 

Shelby Valley (37) – Blake Burke 17; Cody Bentley 8; Cody Potter 7; and Orbie McPeek 5.

 

East Ridge (36) – Chris Bevins 0(3) 0-0 9; Dawson Clark 1 0-0 2; Michael Conn 4 4-6 12; Jordan Keen 2 0-0 4; Matt Miller 1(1) 0-1 5; and Justin Potter 0 3-3 3. Totals: 8(4) 7-10 36.

 

 

 

GIRLS

 

60th District Tournament

 

Lawrence County…..................46

 

Belfry………………....................41

 

LOUISA — Belfry was bounced from the 60th District girls’ tournament as Lawrence County edged the lady Pirates, 46-41, in a game played on Feb. 20

 

Hannah Rucker and Lexi Ratliff tossed in 15 points apiece as the Lady Bulldogs (10-20) secured a spot in the upcoming 15th Region tournament.

 

Lena Hairston tossed in a game-high 17 points as Belfry’s season ends at 15-14.

 

 

 

At Louisa

 

(60th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

BF (15-14)….............................…9 10 9 13 – 41

 

LC (10-20)……...........................8 9 13 16 – 46

 

Scoring:

 

Belfry (41) – Lena Hairston 3(2) 5-6 17; Kenzie Keene 4 0-4 8; McKenzie Maynard 2 0-0 4; Ariel Mounts 0(1) 0-0 3; Linzee Phillips 1 0-0 2; and Kailee Rash 2(1) 0-2 7. Totals: 12(4) 5-12 41.

 

Lawrence County (46) – Hannah Rucker 15; Kelly Davis 9; Kylie Maynard 3; Lexi Ratliff 15; Chelsey Fields 2; and Kassidi Cavins 2. Totals: 11(3) 15-23 46.

 

 

 

57th District Tournament

 

Johnson Central……................53

 

Sheldon Clark………................33

 

SALYERSVILLE — Johnson Central punched its ticket to the 15th Region tournament with a 53-33 win over Sheldon Clark in the opening round of the 57th District girls’ tournament played at Magoffin County High School on Feb. 20.

 

The Lady Golden Eagles, now 25-6, pulled away on the strength of a 24-point, third period.

 

Hannah Fitch paced a balanced scoring attack with 17 points while Lauren Preston followed with 14.

 

Hope Lafferty fired in a game-high 18 points for the Lady Cardinals, who ended 16-14.

 

 

 

At Salyersville

 

(57th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

SC (16-14)…..................................11 7 7 8 – 33

 

JC (25-6)……...............................9 13 24 9 – 55

 

Scoring:

 

Sheldon Clark (33) – Paige Maynard 0(1) 0-1 3; Madison Thompson 2 0-0 4; Hannah Scott 0(1) 0-0 3; Hope Lafferty 4 10-14 18; Fallyne Wefenstette 1 0-3 2; and Kristen Isaac 1 1-1 3. Totals: 8(2) 11-19 33.

 

Johnson Central (55) – Lauren Preston 5(1) 1-3 14; Alaina Castle 1 0-0 2; Ali May 0(1) 5-6 8; Sammi Si4tes 2(1) 0-1 7; Ashley Belcher 1(1) 0-4 5; Morgan Hopson 1 0-0 2; and Hannah Fitch 6(1) 2-3 17. Totals: 16(5) 8-19 55.

 

57th District Tournament

 

Paintsville……….....................55

 

Magoffin County…..................42

 

SALYERSVILLE — Paintsville advanced to the 15th Region tournament with a 55-42 win over Magoffin County in the opening round of the 57th District girls’ tournament played on Feb. 20.

 

Eleanora Lanzani tossed in 14 points and Abby James added 10 as the Lady Tigers improved to 25-3. Anna Keeton chipped in 10. Presley Chirico had nine points and 10 rebounds.

 

Kennedi Stacy finished with 14 for the Lady Hornets (9-19) and totaled 17 rebounds, including 14 defensive grabs. Alexis Montgomery took game-high scoring honors with 19 points.

 

 

 

At Salyersville

 

(57th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PV (25-3)…...............................4 13 21 17 – 55

 

MC (9-19)…...............................8 12 8 14 – 42

 

Scoring:

 

Paintsville (55) – Elizabeth Williams 2 2-2 6; Presley Chirico 4 1-4 9; Anna Keeton 0(3) 1-2 10; Katelyn Fitch 1 0-2 2; Abby James 5 2-2 12; Sonia Williams 0 2-4 2; and Eleanora Lanzani 4(2) 0-0 14. Totals: 16(5) 8-18 55.

 

Magoffin County (42) – Kaelyn Greene 1 0-0 2; Kenlee Wireman 2 0-0 4; Kennedi Stacy 4(2) 0-0 14; Alexis Montgomery 3(4) 1-3 19; and Farrah Montgomery 0(1) 0-0 3. Totals: 10(7) 1-4 42.

 

 

 

58th District Tournament

 

South Floyd…….......................66

 

Allen Central….......................28

 

BETSY LAYNE — South Floyd built a commanding halftime lead against Allen Central and went on to score a 66-28 win in the opening round of the 58th District girls’ tournament played at D.W. Howard Fieldhouse on Feb. 20.

 

Cheyenne Light led a balanced scoring attack for the Lady Raiders (24-7) with a game-high 15 points. Taylor Berger added 13 and Katie Moore chipped in 10.

 

Kelsey Parsons paced the Lady Rebels (8-23) with 13 points.

 

South Floyd advanced to the finals against Betsy Layne. Both will move on to next week’s 15th Region tournament.

 

 

 

At Betsy Layne

 

(58th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

AC (8-23)…...................................5 6 10 7 – 28

 

SF (24-7)…................................28 16 14 8 – 66

 

Scoring:

 

Allen Central (28) – Grace Martin 2 0-0 4; Kelsey Parsons 2(3) 0-1 13; Savannah Watkins 0 1-2 1; Allison Turner 0 1-2 1; Alex Sammons 1 1-4 3; Kayci Poston 1 0-0 2; and Kacy Stumbo 2 0-1 4. Totals: 8(3) 3-10 28.

 

South Floyd (66) – Katie Moore 2(1) 3-4 10; Brooke Stumbo 2 1-2 5; Taylor Berger 3 7-8 13; Cheyenne Light 3(3) 0-0 15; Jessie Tackett 2(1) 1-1 8; Kaylee Moore 3 1-3 7; Kennedy Blevins 1 0-0 2; Emily Branham 1 0-0 2; Kansas Stumbo 1 0-0 2; and Hannah Tackett 0 2-4 2. Totals: 18(5) 15-22 66.

 

 

 

South Floyd…….......................69

 

Piarist School……...................24

 

HI HAT — South Floyd landed five players in double-figure scoring as the Lady Raiders rolled to a 69-24 win over Piarist School in a game played at Raider Arena on Feb. 18.

 

Taylor Berger tossed in a game-high 13 points as South Floyd moved to 23-7. Kennedy Blevins, Kaylee Moore, Jessie Tackett and Katie Moore followed with 10 apiece.

 

Lauren Wright paced the Lady Knights (3-23) with 12 points.

 

 

 

At Hi Hat

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PS (3-23)…...................................6 7 4 7 – 24

 

SF (23-7).....................................18 20 22 9 – 69

 

Scoring:

 

Piarist School (24) – Katie Howard 1 0-0 2; Sydney Francis 1 0-0 2; Kennedy Bowen 0(2) 0-0 6; Taylor Eckle 1 0-0 2; and Lauren Wright 4 4-11 12. Totals: 7(2) 4-11 24.

 

South Floyd (69) – Katie Moore 5 0-0 10; Brooke Stumbo 2 0-0 4; Jessie Tackett 2(1) 3-6 10; Cheyenne Light 2(1) 2-4 9; Taylor Berger 4 5-8 13; Kaylee Moore 5 0-0 10; Kennedy Blevins 4 2-6 10; and Kassedy Osborne 0(1) 0-0 3. Totals: 24(3) 16-24 69.

 

 

 

Letcher Central…....................52

 

Belfry……………......................47

 

ERMINE — Letcher Central held on down the stretch to slip past Belfry, 52-47, in a game played on Feb. 17.

 

Emma Maggard poured in a game-high 19 points and Sydney Caudill tossed in 13 as the Lady Cougars improved to 18-13.

 

Lena Hairston paced the Lady Pirates (15-12) with 18 points and Kailee Rash added 13.

 

 

 

At Ermine

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

BF (15-12)…................................7 12 4 24 – 47

 

LC (18-13)…..............................11 13 6 22 – 52

 

Scoring:

 

Belfry (47) – Robbi-Ann Brewer 0(1) 0-0 3; Lena Hairston 5(2) 2-2 18; Kenzie Keene 2 1-2 5; McKenzie Maynard 3 0-0 6; Ariel Mounts 1 0-0 2; Kailee Rash 4(1) 2-2 13. Totals: 15(4) 5-6 47.

 

Letcher Central (52) – Sydney Caudill 3 7-10 13; Brooklynn Collins 1 2-2 4; Destiny Hall 0 2-2 2; Shelby Hall 4 1-3 9; Cameron Kincer 0 5-6 5; and Emma Maggard 7 5-5 19. Totals: 15 22-29 52.

 

 

 

Shelby Valley….....................…64

 

Hazard…………….....................46

 

ROBINSON CREEK — Shelby Valley dominated from the opening tip as the Lady Kats cruised past Hazard, 64-46, in a game played at the Shelby Valley Sports Center on Feb. 16.

 

Kayla Newsom led the Lady Kats with 14 points while Summer Rose and Cassidi Wright fired in 13 points apiece as Valley improved to 24-4.

 

Desiree Sturgill paced the Lady Bulldogs (12-14) with a game-high 15 points. Olivia Holland added 12.

 

 

 

At Robinson Creek

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

HZ (12-14)….............................5 9 15 17 – 46

 

SV (24-4)…..............................15 21 12 16 – 64

 

Scoring:

 

Hazard (46) – Hayley Caudill 10; Desiree Sturgill 15; Destiny Walker 4; Kiara Walker 5; and Olivia Holland 14.

 

Shelby Valley (64) – Summer Rose 13; Cassidy Rowe 5; Kyleigh Tackett 5; Cassidi Wright 13; Tori Hampton 10; Sadie Compton 2; Alex Stanley 2; and Kayla Newsom 14.

 

 

 

South Floyd…….......................63

 

Pike Central……......................42

 

HI HAT — South Floyd overcame a slow start against Pike County Central to score a 63-42 win in a game played at Raiders Arena on Feb. 16.

 

Taylor Berger stripped the nets for a game-high 20 points while Cheyenne Light tossed in 13 and Katie Moore added 12 as the Lady Raiders improved to 22-7.

 

Kaitlyn Keathley paced the Lady Hawks (19-11) with 13 points and Kylea Stanley added 12.

 

 

 

At Hi Hat

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PC (19-11)…................................9 11 8 14 – 42

 

SF (22-7)….............................…8 18 19 18 – 63

 

Scoring:

 

Pike Central (42) – Cassidy Mullins 1(1) 1-2 6; Kaitlyn Keathley 3(1) 4-4 13; Bailey Birchfield 0 1-2 1; Kylea Stanley 6 0-2 12; Chloe Neece 1 0-0 2; Alicen May 0 2-2 2; Kelsi Brinager 0 2-2 2; Skylar Stumbo 1 0-2 2; Abby Huffman 1 0-0 2. Totals: 13(2) 10-16 42.

 

South Floyd (63) – Katie Moore 4(1) 1-2 12; Brooke Stumbo 3 1-4 7; Taylor Berger 9 2-2 20; Cheyenne Light 5(1) 0-0 13; Jessie Tackett 1(2) 0-0 8; and Kaylee Moore 1 1-2 3. Totals: 23(4) 5-10 63.

 

 

 

Paintsville……........................46

 

Belfry………….........................42

 

PAINTSVILLE — Paintsville held on down the stretch to escape Belfry, 46-42, in a game played at Paintsville Fieldhouse on Feb. 15.

 

Presley Chirico tossed in 14 points and Anna Keeton added 14 as the Lady Tigers moved to 24-3.

 

Lena Hairston scored a game-high 15 points for Belfry, now 15-11. Kailee Rash chipped in nine.

 

 

 

At Paintsville

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

BF (15-11)…..............................10 14 7 11 – 42

 

PV (24-3)…...........................…15 13 8 10 – 46

 

Scoring:

 

Belfry (42) – Robbi-Ann Brewer 1(2) 0-0 8; Kenzie Keene 2 0-2 4; McKenzie Maynard 3 0-0 6; Lena Hairston 6(1) 0-0 15; and Kailee Rash 0(3) 0-0 9. Totals: 12(6) 0-2 42.

 

Paintsville (46) – Elizabeth Williams 0 0-1 0; Presley Chirico 5 4-6 14; Katelyn Newsome 3(2) 2-2 14; Katelyn Fitch 3 0-0 6; Eleanora Lanzani 3 2-2 8; and Abby James 2 0-0 4. Totals: 16(2) 8-11 46.

 

ON THE MOVE: Betsy Layne’s Megan Frazier (3) races up the floor at D.W. Howard Fieldhouse as Jenkins’ Morgan Henson gives chase. Frazier led the Lady Bobcats past the Lady Cavaliers.
Medical Leader | Photo by TEDDY PAYNTER
Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, February 24, 2017

Gracie Annlynn Yates, daughter of Kayla Lester and Bryan Yates, born Feb. 7; weight: 7 lbs., 5 oz.

 

Ava Lynn Rowe, daughter of Amy and Andy Rowe, born Feb. 7; weight: 8 lbs., 10 oz.

 

Mika Ann Thacker, daughter of Courtney and Justin Thacker, born Feb. 7; weight: 6 lbs., 1 oz.

 

Bentlee Kade Williamson, twin son of Nakia Cantrell and Jimmy Williamson, born Feb. 7; weight: 6 lbs., 4 oz.; Brantley Kash Williamson, twin son, 6 lbs., 4 oz.

 

Mika Ann Thacker, daughter of Courtney and Justin Thacker, born Feb. 7; weight: 6 lbs., 1 oz.

 

Jenna Leigh Parks, daughter of Nikki and Jesse Parks, born Feb. 6; weight: 6 lbs., 3 oz.

 

Josie Marie Blevins, daughter of Ashley Damron and Joshua Blevins, born Feb 4; weight: 6 lbs., 3 oz.

 

Jaylen Marie Barton, daughter of Stephanie Morrison and Coby Barton, born Feb. 4; weight: 6 lbs., 5 oz.

 

Nathanial Blaze Turner Tackett, son of Leeann and Nathaniel Tackett, born Feb. 4; weight; 6 lbs., 14 oz.

 

Weston Gage Hamilton, son of Karissa Rocchi and Eric Hamilton, born Feb. 3; weight: 8 lbs., 7 oz.

 

Sophia Grace Bateman, daughter of Sarah and Corey Bateman, born Feb. 3; weight: 6 lbs.

 

Audrey Leigh Wampler, daughter of Cora Rutherford and Jonathan Wampler, born Feb. 3; weight: 6 lbs., 10 oz.

 

Mila Claire Prater, daughter of Priscilla and Michael Prater Jr., born Feb. 3; weight: 7 lbs., 2 oz.

 

Marcus Dale Tackett, son of Rachel and Evan Tackett, born Feb. 2; weight: 7 lbs. 2 oz.

 

Eli William Luke Howell, son of Sarai and Tivis Howell, born Feb. 2; weight: 7 lbs., 8.9 oz.

 

Landree Skylar Jo Akers, daughter of Amanda Smith and Jeremy Akers, born Feb. 2; weight: 5 lbs., 13.2 oz.

 

Paislee Jade Rose, daughter of Courtney Hunt and Terry Rose, born Feb. 2; weight: 7 lbs., 1 oz.

 

Hunter Keith Ray Clark, son of Kaitlen Bowling and Joshua Clark, born Feb. 2; weight: 5 lbs., 12 oz.

 

Alexis Lashae Williams, daughter of Miranda Cochran and Ronnie Williams, born Feb. 2; weight: 7 lbs.

 

Aubre Michelle Coleman, daughter of Hailey and Alex Coleman, born Feb. 2; weight: 7 lbs., 14 oz.

Friday, February 17, 2017

PIKEVILLE — There were plenty of smiles when Pikeville High School’s (PHS) varsity cheerleaders returned home earlier this week after competing on the national stage in Orlando, Fla.

 

The girls captured a second straight national championship and fourth in school history.

 

“Our theme this year was to believe in ourselves,” second-year head coach Kandice Branham said. “We wanted to stay focused on our routine and not worry about what the other teams were doing.”

 

Competing in the national spotlight has become routine for PHS. The squad also won national titles in 2001 and 2002.

 

The future is bright for the squad, which loses only seniors Christen Ousley and Catie Rowe.

 

“It’s just an unbelievable feeling to go out as a national champion,” Ousley said. “It doesn’t seem real…it’s just the greatest thing.”

 

Rowe said to go out her senior year with another title was a dream come true.

 

“To know that I’m a two-time national champion is really special for me,” Rowe said.

 

Coach Branham said her team handled the pressure well, especially after having the lead following their opening floor exercise.

 

“I thought our girls really were focused,” she said. “We went in as the favorite and did everything we had to do to win.”

 

Pikeville’s journey to Orlando began last July when the group attended UCA camp at the University of Kentucky.

 

Branham said her team’s practice schedule can run anywhere from five to six days a week, and even Thanksgiving and Christmas breaks sharpening their skills for the nationals.

 

“Once we get closer to nationals we try and compete or perform somewhere every weekend in January.

 

Branham said having a strong support staff of coaches and trainers is an added bonus for the program.

 

“Any time we learn a new stunt we have one group go and the rest of the team will stand around closely spotting ready to catch the top girl if needed,” she said.

 

Branham said the highlight of this year’s winning routine was the tumbling and end pyramid.

 

The final two squads were both from Kentucky. Branham said waiting to hear the runner-up school announced was heart-wrenching.

 

“To put on the white jacket for the first time was a wonderful feeling, but it was such a relief to know that everything we had worked on for so long paid off,” she concluded.

 

Can the team three-peat?

 

Tryouts will begin for the 2016-17 team in April.

Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, February 17, 2017

Eddie Phillips of Pikeville had a heart attack on Dec. 17, 2016. A completely normal day became a life changer for Phillips. What started as pressure in his chest ended in a surgery suite at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC).

 

Phillips said, “I was at home when I experienced pressure in my chest but I just thought it was indigestion. When the pain did not go away I headed for the hospital.”

 

He presented at the PMC Emergency Department (ED) and was taken straight to the cardiac catheterization (cath) lab.

 

“The cath procedure only took a little while because it was pretty clear there was a lot of work that had to be done,” said Phillips. “Dr. Halpin was on call and words cannot express how thankful I am for that.”

 

Phillips says PMC’s Cardiothoracic Surgeon Dermot P. Halpin, MD was ready to care for him.

 

“He put me at ease and I was not afraid,” said Phillips. “He knew what he was doing, he had a definite plan for my care and I will always be indebted to him for saving my life. In my opinion, Dr. Halpin is worth his weight in gold.”

 

Phillips had beds ready and waiting for him at two other well-known hospitals, but after discussing his condition with several additional physicians, Phillips followed their advice and chose PMC.

 

“They told me I really did not need to go anywhere else for heart care and they were absolutely right,” said Phillips.

 

Phillips praised the PMC Heart and Vascular Institute and said the people of eastern Kentucky are fortunate to have this strong team of professionals close to home.

 

“They are a great group,” he said. “Everyone in the ED, intensive care unit (ICU), the cath lab, surgery and on the floor did amazing work. I was treated like a baby, as was everyone else around me. I did not ask for anything that I did not receive, they are a great bunch.”

 

After his coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, Phillips says life is getting back to normal.

 

He is working in a local furniture store in Pikeville after retiring from a 23 year career in the insurance business. He is taking life a little slower now.

 

“I walk a lot, stay active and I listen to what my body is telling me,” said Phillips. “When you go from 10’ tall and bullet proof to 5’4” with the realization you really can be hurt, it is a game changer.”

 

He is currently a patient in PMC’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program and says he is growing stronger each day.

 

Phillips turned to PMC at the most critical moment of his life and encourages anyone dealing with heart problems to do the same.

 

“I could not have received better treatment anywhere,” he said. “I encourage anyone with heart disease to take advantage of the heart program at PMC.”

 

Phillips says he has a different take on the American Heart Month now.

 

“Heart month is every month for me now,” he said. “I take better care of myself and I try to watch my stress levels. This is something I will get over but I will not forget it because my heart will not let me. “

 

To schedule an appointment with a physician in the PMC Heart and Vascular Institute call 606-218-2201.

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, February 17, 2017

The Wound Care Center at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) specializes in healing wounds that have resisted other treatments. Types of wounds that are difficult to heal include diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers or wounds associated with poor circulation just to name a few.

 

Kenny Frasure of Pikeville, a diabetic who suffers from chronic osteomyelitis, is having success with treatment at PMC’s Wound Care Center. Osteomyelitis is a bone infection in the foot which in the past was considered incurable.

 

“Before I started the treatments, I was in a lot of pain and discomfort,” said Frasure. “I was worried that I was going to lose my foot.”

 

Dr. Molly Meier, podiatrist, is treating Frasure with a combination of therapies.

 

“Wound care is a combination of the right treatment for each individual patient,” said Dr. Meier. “One therapy alone is never as successful as several together.”

 

Dr. Meier prescribed Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) for Frasure’s wound. In this treatment, patients lie in a pressurized chamber, breathing pure oxygen. The oxygen is forced into the blood stream which carries it to the wound site or infection. This creates the formation of new capillary beds in the wound which ultimately establishes healing.

 

Frasure was also fitted with a total contact cast by a casting specialist at the PMC Wound Care Center. This type of cast is designed to take weight off the ulcer to enable healing.

 

With only a few treatments left to complete, Frasure is very pleased with the results.

 

“The HBOT and the cast together have healed my foot, and the HBOT is even making the hair on my head grow back!” he laughed.

 

Frasure is not expecting his wounds to return but he is following up with Dr. Meier to keep a check on his feet.

 

“This hospital is the best thing to happen to eastern Kentucky,” continued Frasure. “They have the best doctors right here in Pikeville.”

 

The PMC Wound Care Center is staffed by professionals who are certified in wound care. Staff physicians include Dr. John Fleming, medical director, Dr. Tim Wright, surgeon and Dr. Molly Meier, podiatrist. David Thacker serves as the HBOT Safety Director and has completed training and certification in this field.

 

For more information on the PMC Wound Care Center call 606-218-4721.

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, February 17, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) is hosting a blood drive on Thursday, March 2, from 7am to 2:30pm at the PMC Clinic – 11th floor. The drive is conducted by Kentucky Blood Center (KBC), PMC’s only source of blood and blood products.

 

This blood drive features a drawing for tickets to regional events and attractions including four grandstand tickets to the Keeneland Spring Meet in Lexington, two admission tickets to the Louisville Zoo, tickets to a Cincinnati Reds home baseball game and two general admission tickets to Kings Island.

 

“We are grateful to these organizations for their donations of tickets,” said Kathy Atkins, PMC blood donor chairman. “The tickets, along with t-shirts donated by KBC, encourages people to take the time to give blood.”

 

Giving blood is safe, simple and it saves lives.

 

KBC relies solely on volunteer blood donors to supply nearly 70 hospitals throughout the Commonwealth. The current demand for blood is 400 units a day. In order to meet this demand, Kentucky Blood Center works with community leaders to establish blood drives in schools, churches and places of business on a regular basis. There are five permanent blood donation locations including one in Pikeville. There is also a mobile blood collection team that travels throughout the Commonwealth daily.

 

At the blood drive when a donor arrives, they will be asked a short series of screening questions to establish whether they qualify to give. Once this is completed, the donor will then be able to participate in saving someone’s life by giving blood – a process that only takes about 12 minutes.

 

To be eligible to give blood, one must be in good health, weight at least 110 pounds, be at least 16 years of age (parental permission is required for 16-year-old donors), and show a photo ID such as a driver’s license.

 

There is no faster or easier way to know that a life has been saved than by giving blood. A donation of one pint of blood can save as many as three lives.

 

For more information about PMC’s upcoming blood drive, please call Kathy Atkins at 606-218-4609 or call Kentucky Blood Center at 606-432-4979.

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, February 17, 2017

Judy Faye Nelson, 65, of McDowell, died Feb. 10. Funeral service, Feb. 13. Burial, Nelson Family Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

 

Johnny Graham Hall, 61, of Ivel, died Feb. 9. Funeral service, Feb. 12 at Boldman Freewill Baptist Church, Harold. Burial, Stratton Cemetery, Ivel.

 

Wanda Inez Howard, 66, of Martin, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 11. Burial, Jarvis Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

 

Duane Oden, 62, of Wheelwright, died Feb. 11. Funeral service, Feb. 18 at Wheelwright Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens.

 

Sharon Marie Riley, 50, of Hueysville, died Feb. 13. Funeral service, Feb. 17. Burial, Banks-Turner Cemetery, Hueysville.

 

Bill Newman, 92, of Melvin, died Feb. 12. He was a WWII Army Veteran. Funeral service, Feb. 17. Burial, Newman Cemetery, Melvin.

 

Thurmal “Jake” Shepherd, 72, of Hueysville, died Feb. 7. Funeral service, Feb. 11. Burial, Shepherd Cemetery, Hueysville.

 

Larry Newsome, 59, of Hi Hat, died Feb. 10. Funeral service, Feb. 15. Burial, Burton Cemetery, Ligon.

 

Glenn Holbrook, 81, of Prestonsburg, died Feb. 11. Funeral service, Feb. 14. Burial, Gethsemane Gardens, Prestonsburg.

 

Barbara Joyce Williamson, 80, of Pikeville, died Feb. 9. Funeral service, Feb. 12. Burial, Williams Cemetery, Kimper.

 

Donna Sue Holloway, 54, of Pikeville, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 12 at Virgie Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Johnson Memorial Park.

 

Herman “Oot” Stalker, 92, of Mount Sterling formerly of Elkhorn City, died Feb. 9. Funeral service, Feb. 12. Burial, Dow Brooks Cemetery.

 

Charles Adkins, 73, of Oxford, Miss. formerly of Draffin, died Feb. 11. Funeral service, Feb. 11. Burial, Wilson Cemetery, Draffin.

 

Anita Bentley Snodgrass Hillman, 51, of Louisville, died Feb. 12. Funeral service, Feb. 18. Burial, Snodgrass Cemetery, Joe’s Creek.

 

Williamson Earnest Griffey, 66, of Feds Creek, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 16. Burial, Jones Cemetery, Steele.

 

Gary Dean Feldpusch, 79, of Elkhorn City, died Feb. 13. Funeral service, Feb. 13.

 

Keither Williams, 100, of Lick Creek, died Feb. 12. Funeral service, Feb. 16. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery, Pikeville.

 

Palmer Gene Bush, 69, of Harold, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 12 at Betsy Layne Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Bush-Meade Cemetery, Toler Creek.

 

Ethel Mae Ramey Potter, 93, of Pikeville, died Feb. 13. Funeral service, Feb. 16. Burial, Conn Cemetery, Harold.

 

Thomas Jeffery Phillips, 59, of Pikeville, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 10 at Full Gospel Fellowship Church.

 

Phillip Allen Collins, 35, of Varney, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 11 at Pilgrim Home O Regular Baptist Church. Burial, Williamson Cemetery, Varney.

 

Ruth B. Deskins, 88, of Meta, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 12. Burial, Deskins Family Cemetery, Meta.

 

Genevieve Haney, 77, of Borderland, W.Va., died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 12. Burial, Collins Cemetery.

 

Rush Muncy, 89, of Turkey Creek, died Feb. 7. Funeral service, Feb. 11. Burial, Sartin Cemetery.

 

Betty Jo LaRue, 67, of Ransom, died Feb. 11. Funeral service, Feb. 14.

 

Okey Simpkins, 92, of Bluff City, Tenn., died Feb. 13. Funeral service, Feb. 115. Burial, Mountain View Memory Gardens, Maher, W.Va.

 

Amos Gibson, 63, of Garrett, died Feb. 7. Funeral service, Feb. 8 at the Gibson Family Cemetery, Garrett.

 

Freda Lou Campbell, 65, of Stanville, died Feb. 8. Funeral service, Feb. 11. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

 

Edith Calhoun, 79, of Dorton, died Feb. 9. Funeral service, Feb. 13. Burial, Precious Memories Cemetery.

Friday, February 17, 2017

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