Richard Lee Swiney, 70, of Nichelsville, passed away May 29. Funeral, May 31. Burial, Parrigan Cemetery, Clincho, Va.

 

Judith Diana Hager Fields, 76, of Winchester, passed away May 28. Funeral, May 31. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

 

Harry Gordon Johnson, 70, of Melvin, passed away May 26. Funeral, May 30, Wheelwright Freewill Baptist Church, Byrpo. Burial, Buckingham Cemetery, Bevinsville.

 

Phyllis Lee Hughes, 68, of Prestonsburg, passed away May 25. Funeral, May 29.

 

Bogaline Newsome Hamilton, 68, of Grethel, passed away May 25. Funeral, May 28, Samaria Old Regular Baptist Church, Teaberry. Burial, Hall Family Cemetery, Banner.

 

Billy Joe Hamilton, 69, of McDowell, passed away May 24. He was a U.S. Army veteran, having served during the Vietnam War. Funeral, May 28. Burial, Thomas Hamilton Cemetery, Teaberry.

 

Elmer Gene Holbrook, 79, of Prestonsburg, passed away May 24. Funeral, May 27, Highlands Avenue Freewill Baptist Church, Prestonsburg. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

 

Walker Dale Hunter, the infant son of Kennedy Stumbo and Willis Hunter, died May 18. Graveside services, May 20, Martin Community Cemetery.

 

Bobby Gene Sammons, 66, of Pikeville, passed away May 24. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Funeral, May 27. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery, Pikeville.

 

Gail Hylton Smith, 85, of Pikeville, passed away May 24. Funeral, May 27, First Christian Church, Chloe Road. Burial, Johnson Memorial Park, Pikeville.

 

Betty Joyce Collins, 74, of Printer, passed away May 25. Funeral, May 28. Burial, Martin Family Cemetery, Printer.

 

Jackie Click, 73, of Martin, passed away May 23. Funeral, May 26. Burial, Click Family Cemetery, Martin.

 

Ralph Jack Slone, 86, of Langley, passed away May 23. He was a U.S. Army veteran, having served during the Korean Conflict. Funeral, May 26. Burial, Pete Martin Cemetery, Eastern.

 

Dennis Randall “Denny” Crigger, 67, of Williamson, W.Va., passed away May 24. Funeral, May 27, Grace Baptist Temple, Williamson. Burial, Mountain View Memory Gardens, Maher, W.Va.

 

Connie Christine Maynard, 54, of Hazard, formerly of Belfry, passed away May 22. The body has been cremated.

 

James Irving “Butch” Joplin, Sr., 69, of Red Jacket, W.Va., passed away May 23. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran, having served during the Vietnam War. He was a longtime high school and former University of Pikeville assistant coach. Funeral, May 27, Mount Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church, Red Jacket. Burial, Mountain View Memory Gardens, Maher, W.Va.

 

Thomas Lee Shell, 68, of Pikeville, passed away May 25. Funeral, May 28. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery.

 

Phyllis Joyce Walker, 70, of Pikeville, passed away May 25. Funeral, May 28. Burial, Richmond Cemetery.

 

Maxine Hall Marshall, 75, of Pikeville, died May 26. Funeral, May 28. Burial, Green Berry Hall Cemetery, Branham’s Creek.

 

Rita Fay Ray, 57, of Rockhouse, passed away May 24. Funeral, May 29, Pilgrim House Old Regular Baptist Church. Burial, Ray Family Cemetery, Rockhouse.

Friday, June 2, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Pikeville city officials honored the life of longtime attorney Pamela Todd May by presenting her family with the “Community Ambassador Award” prior to her services this past week.

 

The proclamation was presented to her husband, Walter E. May, and family members.

 

May, who served as chief legal counsel for 31 years at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC), passed away on May 14.

 

After the proclamation was read aloud during its May 22 meeting, commissioners commended Pam’s dedication and hard work throughout the City of Pikeville and eastern Kentucky.

 

“It has been an honor working with Pam and Walter,” Pikeville City Mayor Jimmy Carter said. “She was gracious with her time and she will dearly be missed, especially by the hospital community.”

 

City Manager Donovan Blackburn went on to call May “an inspirational leader, wonderful, giving and a caring person.”

 

“Without expecting recognition, she gave her time, expertise and energy to charities, Sunday School classes, and was a mentor to many,” he added.

 

Blackburn, who was recently named PMC Assistant Chief Executive Officer, said spending the past 13 years working closely with May was a privilege.

 

“I was able to work with her on a number of projects that resulted in the continued growth of PMC and our great community,” he added.

 

Others echoed those same comments.

 

Commissioner Steve Hartsock said May’s kindness to others was unmatched.

 

“I had the opportunity to talk with Pam on several occasions about our community and ways we could work together in making it a better place for everyone . She will surely be missed,” he said.

 

The award is the highest given to a citizen, and is presented to an individual each year that best exemplifies and promotes all things Pikeville.

 

“Over the years I have known and worked with Pam, she has always been one of the biggest proponents of what we are doing currently, have accomplished, and planning for the future for the city along with PMC. This plaque will be displayed in City Hall alongside previous winners,” Carter concluded.

Author Name: 
Abigail Gibson
Friday, May 26, 2017

WHITESBURG — The Letcher County Farmers Market is once again participating in the USDA Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) for the fourth year.

 

The market, fiscally sponsored by the City of Whitesburg, was developed to provide residents with fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

The SFSP ensures that low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. More than 2,200 sites in Kentucky provide almost 2.5 million breakfasts, lunches and snacks to Kentucky children annually through SFSP.

 

Kentucky ranks 49th in utilizing the SFSP.

 

“The intent behind beginning the SFSP was to pair the need for healthy meals with abundant produce. This allows increased sales for growers and fresh meals for local youth,” Valerie Horn said.

 

Horn said produce is purchased from growers on site and prepared on site the same day. Any youth under the age of 18 is eligible to receive a free meal.

 

A new attraction at the Letcher County Farmers Market is a Fender Blender which was graciously donated by Mountain Comprehensive Health Clinic.

 

“The idea is to connect physical activity with tasty snacks. Bikers peddle to make the blender generate to create a fresh smoothie with local fruits, honey and yogurt,” she added.

 

The market is committed to making local fresh food accessible to all. They now accept alternative payment methods including, WIC, SNAP and Senior Vouchers.

 

“All of our growers are local to the Letcher County region. Many are members of Kentucky Proud and Appalachia Proud. We also support other vendors including local crafters, artisans and musicians,” Horn added.

 

Last year we served 140 free meals.

 

“We are hopeful to become an At Risk sponsor and provide meals after the SFSP ends,” she said.

 

The Cowan Community Center will also be offering free meals to children at their summer camps.

 

“Everyone is welcome to participate in the summer camps at Cowan Community Center located at 81 Sturgill Branch in Whitesburg. The center will kick off their summer camp on June 2 with Art and end on July 17. The summer camps are sponsored by Appalachian Fund at Berea College,” she concluded

 

Individuals interested in participating in the summer camps can call, 606-633-3187.

 

The market is located at 100 E. Main St., Whitesburg in the Veterans Memorial Parking Lot.

 

The market runs each Saturday beginning June 3 through October from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and on Wednesday’s in July through August from 3:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

 

Anyone interested in starting a food service program can contact Cathy Gallagher with the Kentucky Department of Education at 502-564-5625 x4933 or cathy.gallagher@education.ky.gov.

 

For more information call Valerie Horn at 606-634-9468 or letchercofarmersmarket.org.

Author Name: 
Abigail Gibson
Friday, May 26, 2017

A Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) employee’s family has been touched by the quality of care their daughter/granddaughter received.

 

MaKayla Caudill, the teen daughter of Michelle Caudill, RN, who works in recovery is grateful for the services provided by PMC. Her grandfather is Mike Newsome who has worked in Information Systems for many years.

 

On a routine appointment at the PMC pediatric clinic, it was noted that there was swelling in her neck that extended behind her ear and some swelling in her tongue. Although MaKayla did not complain of any uncomfortable symptoms associated with the swelling, it caused concern and she was referred to PMC otolaryngologist Dr. William Hoskins who ordered a CT scan of the area.

 

An otolaryngologist is a physician trained in the management and treatment of diseases and disorders of the ear, nose and throat (also known as ENT) and related areas of the head and neck.

 

To everyone’s surprise, the scan revealed a large mass or tumor in MaKayla’s parapharyngeal space. This is a deep compartment in the neck that can easily hide a large tumor.

 

“Tumors in that area are usually noticed when a mass develops,” said Dr. Hoskins. “They are typically non-cancerous but may start growing during the hormonal changes associated with puberty.”

 

MaKayla’s whole family was shocked to hear the news but thankful that the tumor was found before any problems occurred.

 

Carol Newsome, MaKayla’s grandmother and “official taxi driver,” said this about Dr. Hoskins:

 

“Not only is he a wonderful person — he is very kind, very polite, and sweet – but he seems to be a person of the Lord. You can’t make a good doctor unless you’ve got a good heart as a person. His heart and his concern goes above and beyond.

 

For now, MaKayla’s physicians are keeping an eye on the tumor for any changes but eventually, she may have to have it surgically removed.

 

“I am happy with the way things are going,” said MaKayla’s pediatrician Dr. Brad Akers. “Hopefully, the tumor will continue to be benign. MaKayla is a lovely young lady and we are always happy to see her at the clinic.”

 

MaKayla keeps a positive attitude about her diagnosis and doesn’t let it bring her down. She is a busy Shelby Valley High School student.

 

To make an appointment with pediatrics at PMC, call 606-218-2207 and to make an appointment with an ENT physician call 606-218-2209.

 

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, May 26, 2017

Jordan Compton has served two years as a sales representative for Pikeville Medical Center’s (PMC) Medical Leader.

 

Off the clock, Compton is the head coach for the Shelby Valley High School baseball team.

 

“We are 21-7 right now,” said Compton. “We broke a school record for the most wins in a single year, a record my team actually set last year. We have also made back-to-back regional tournament appearances, a first in the school’s history.”

 

This year marks Compton’s second year at Shelby Valley and his 12th year of coaching, but he says he has played baseball all his life.

 

He graduated from Haysi High School in Va., and was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles straight out of high school.

 

His professional baseball career came to an abrupt end due to an injury. Compton found himself with no plans to play professional or college baseball. He did however; start coaching and it was not long before a coach from the University of Pikeville, which was Pikeville College at that time, came to watch him work with one of his teams.

 

The coach was anxious to find out about Compton’s college eligibility. After he saw Compton make three pitches off the mound, the coach was quick to offer him a full scholarship.

 

“My baseball injury took away the best thing I had, at that time, but it also gave me the opportunity to come to Pikeville where I found the best thing I have ever found and that was my wife,” Compton said.

 

During his two years at Pikeville College, Compton led the Mid-South Conference in strikeouts and earned run average (ERA).

 

During his second year he ranked second in the nation in ERA. During 2016 Compton was inducted into the UPIKE Athletic Hall of Fame.

 

“I probably have spent 99 percent of my life on a baseball field,” said Compton. “If I am not working at my full-time job at PMC, I am usually out at the field. My father was also a high school baseball coach for 25 years so baseball life is all I have known.”

 

Compton finds great joy through coaching. He has been asked to be in weddings for his players. He has also been asked to come to the hospital to be with one of his players as he welcomed his baby daughter into the world.

 

“My joy comes through relationships with my players,” said Compton. “The best honor is to see these kids go on and succeed in life, get jobs and help out in our community.  When I see them at the school, on the street or throughout the community they continue to greet me as coach.”

 

Compton has two daughters who are following closely in their father’s footsteps. 

 

“My girls love the game. Every evening they want to be on the ball field,” he said. “They always want our team to play home games so they can run the bases after the game is over.” 

 

Compton is quick to encourage students to participate in multiple sports.

 

“We live in a basketball state and our region is dominated by football but I want kids to understand they can play and succeed at multiple sports,” he said. “They do not have to be locked into playing one sport.  I tell them all the time that when baseball is over they need to be playing something else, get involved and get active, get out there.”

 

He says playing multiple sports will only make them better. His best advice for athletes everywhere is to get out and be active.

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, May 26, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) celebrates Oncology Nurses Month. Oncology nurses provide fearless commitment and endless compassion to patients every day.

 

Cancer is a disease that affects people regardless of gender, nationality or age. Oncology nurses profoundly impact the lives of so many cancer patients and their families at PMC. They are there to explain the diagnosis, guide patients through treatment, celebrate their victories, and comfort them through the unimaginable.

 

“The strength of an oncology nurse comes from the passion of helping another human being navigate a journey through one of the most difficult times in their lives,” said Cheryl Hickman, RN, Vice President-Assistant to President/CEO. “The patients become family, and the bond that is created lasts forever.”

 

Oncology nurses are on the front lines of cancer treatment and care.

 

“Oncology nurses are a special group of people who develop close relationships with their patients,” said Amber Tackett, RN, Assistant Vice President of Patient Services. “Oncology nurses make every day the best it can be for that patient,” said Tackett.

 

“Several of them are facing a life-altering diagnosis,” Tackett continued, “and oncology nurses are there to offer compassion and support during the most difficult time of their lives.”

 

At PMC, cancer patients interact with oncology nurses in three separate areas: The Leonard Lawson Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, and 4E, the Inpatient Unit.

 

“Oncology nurses are strong individuals with a special heart striving to meet the needs of each patient that comes to them for care,” said Marigo Werner, RN, Leonard Lawson Cancer Center Manager. “Whether it is to hold a hand, provide a shoulder to cry on, an ear for listening, administering treatment, educating, or simply being there when needed, an oncology nurse is at the center of patient care,” Werner continued. “Oncology keeps me grounded and reminds me daily how truly blessed I am and shows me the amazing strength of the human spirit.”

 

“Cancer effects much more than the body alone, this is why great oncology nurses also nurture the mind and spirit of the patients they serve,” explained Holly Baker, Radiation Oncology Manager. “Our nurses have the ability to take a difficult experience and make it a little easier to bear,” continued Baker. “To me, this is one of the greatest things an oncology nurse can do and it is both a privilege and responsibility.”

 

“These nurses are the most compassionate, caring group of nurses I’ve ever had the privilege to work with,” said Vickie Justus, RN, Unit 4E Manager.

 

“There is a saying I hear around this time every year about oncology nurses,” explained Justus, “If you think my hands are full, you should see my heart. That describes our staff better than anything I could say.”

 

PMC has approximately 45 oncology nurses working in Radiation Oncology, inpatient care and at the Leonard Lawson Cancer Center.

 

“Not everyone can do oncology nursing,” concluded Hickman, “but those that do, have chosen a career that enables them to give skilled and compassionate care every day.”

 

For more information or to schedule an appointment at the Leonard Lawson Cancer Center, call 606-218-2212.

Author Name: 
Amy Charles
Friday, May 26, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) is observing Critical Care Awareness Month to recognize dedicated professionals who care for critically ill patients and their families.

 

PMC encourages the public to applaud the efforts of the critical care team during the month of May.

 

PMC is raising awareness for the valuable work of critical care nurses and health care professionals who provide world-class quality health care to our region.

 

“This observance is an excellent time to recognize the dedication and commitment that our critical care team members demonstrate every day to their patients and families,” PMC Director of Critical Care Josh Damron said.

 

“The devoted professionals whose compassion and dedication, to the care of the critically ill and injured has made a significant difference in the lives of patients and their families at our facility.”

 

Damron said PMC wants to ensure that all our highly skilled and specialized health care professionals get the recognition they deserve.

 

Damron hosted a lunch for PMC’s Critical Care staff and presented them with a small gift to show appreciation for their work.

Author Name: 
Amanda Jo Lawson
Friday, May 26, 2017

Planting time is upon us.

 

Over the long winter months you may have poured over seed catalogs as you planned your garden or flower beds. Now you’ve made your purchases and wait to plant them in the ground. You know the handful of seeds you plant will yield a return many times greater than what was planted. Seeds packed with potential.

 

Consider for a moment that you are that seed. Locked in you is a person prepared to thrive and bear much fruit.

 

By giving yourself over to the will and use by God you become planted metaphorically in the Garden of God.

 

What great things are hidden inside of you?

 

What potential to please God and help others is hidden inside the seed that is you?

 

“Expect great things from God. Attempt great things for God.” William Carey

 

 

 

~ PMC Chaplain Randy Johnson may be reached at 606-218-3969 or by e-mail at: randy.johnson@pikevillehospital.org.

Friday, May 26, 2017

Planting time is upon us.

 

Over the long winter months you may have poured over seed catalogs as you planned your garden or flower beds. Now you’ve made your purchases and wait to plant them in the ground. You know the handful of seeds you plant will yield a return many times greater than what was planted. Seeds packed with potential.

 

Consider for a moment that you are that seed. Locked in you is a person prepared to thrive and bear much fruit.

 

By giving yourself over to the will and use by God you become planted metaphorically in the Garden of God.

 

What great things are hidden inside of you?

 

What potential to please God and help others is hidden inside the seed that is you?

 

“Expect great things from God. Attempt great things for God.” William Carey

 

 

 

~ PMC Chaplain Randy Johnson may be reached at 606-218-3969 or by e-mail at: randy.johnson@pikevillehospital.org.

Friday, May 26, 2017

LOUISA — Perennial power Lawrence County overcame a one-run deficit early on against Belfry and the Bulldogs went on to eliminate the Pirates from the 60th District tournament with a 7-1 win in the opening round on May 22.

 

Belfry’s lone run came on Devin Varney’s RBI-single into leftfield, scoring Austin Woolum who had walked.

 

Brad Parks’ RBI single tied the game in the home second inning and Austin Roe’s two-run single put Lawrence County, now 21-11, ahead to stay.

 

C.J. Fairchild was the winning pitcher while Avery Browning suffered the loss.

 

Belfry’s season ended at 8-21.

 

 

 

At Louisa

 

(60th District tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

BF (8-21)…..............................100 000 0 – 1-5-3

 

LC (21-11)...............................030 220 x – 7-6-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – C.J. Fairchild

 

LP – Avery Browning

 

Hitting: Devin Varney 1b, 1 RBI, Belfry; Austin Roe 1b, 1r, 2 RBI, Lawrence County.

 

 

 

Shelby Valley…….....................14

 

East Ridge…………....................0

 

LICK CREEK — Shelby Valley erupted for six runs in the bottom of the first inning and the Wildcats rolled to a 14-0 win over East Ridge in the opening round of the 59th District tournament played on the Reservation on May 22.

 

Chris Gunter had two hits, scored three runs and drove in two as the Wildcats improved to 21-7 while advancing to the finals against Pikeville.

 

Gabriel Brown singled, scored twice and knocked in two runs while Jacob Beverly singled twice and scored three times. Jackson Wierewille added two hits, scored and added an RBI.

 

Ty Riddle was the winning pitcher while Dakota Miller suffered the loss as the Warriors finished 1-18.

 

 

 

At Lick Creek

 

(59th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

ER (1-18)..............................….000 00 – 0- 3-4

 

SV (21-7)...............................…624 2x – 14-12-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Ty Riddle

 

LP – Dakota Miller

 

Hitting: Chris Gunter 2-1b, 3r, 2 RBI; Gabriel Brown 1b, 2r, 2 RBI; Jacob Beverly 2-1b, 3r; Jackson Wirewille 2-1b, 1r, 1 RBI, Shelby Valley.

 

 

 

Prestonsburg….......................15

 

Betsy Layne……........................0

 

STONECREST — Prestonsburg ran out to a big lead early against Betsy Layne and cruised to a 15-0 win in the opening round of the 58th District tournament played at StoneCrest Sports Complex on May 22.

 

Ben Welch had two hits, including a double, scored one run and drove in four as the Blackcats improved to 23-9 while eliminating Betsy Layne.

 

Tanner Hicks had one hit, scored and knocked in three runs while Reece Ison added a pair of RBI.

 

Wesley Hager was the winning pitcher.

 

Zach Bentley suffered the loss as the Bobcats finished 4-24. Steven Boyd and Colby Bentley had the only hits for Betsy Layne.

 

 

 

At StoneCrest

 

(58th District Tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

BL (4-24)…...............................000 00 – 0- 2-4

 

PB (23-9)…...............................654 0x – 15-11-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Wesley Hager

 

LP – Zach Bentley

 

Hitting: Ben Welch 2b, 1b, 1r, 4 RBI; Tanner Hicks 1b, 1r, 3 RBI; Reece Ison 2 RBI, Prestonsburg.

 

 

 

Johnson Central…...................10

 

Sheldon Clark…....................….0

 

PAINTSVILLE — Johnson Central’s Braxton Kelly allowed just two hits as the Golden Eagles blanked Sheldon Clark, 10-0, in the opening round of the 57th District tournament played on May 22.

 

Geordon Blanton belted a home run, singled, scored twice and knocked in two runs as the Golden Eagles improved to 27-7 while reaching the finals.

 

Riley Preece had two hits, walked twice, scored and batted in one run while Trevor May collected two hits and added an RBI. Austin Davis doubled, scored and drove in one run.

 

Jon Jon Fitch suffered the loss.

 

 

 

At Paintsville

 

(57th District tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

SC (14-17)…...........................000 000 – 0- 2-6

 

JC (27-7)…..........................…310 222 – 10-10-2

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Braxton Kelly

 

LP – Jon Jon Fitch

 

Hitting: Geordon Blanton HR, 1b, 2r, 2 RBI; Riley Preece 2-1b, 2-bb, 1r, 1 RBI; Trevor May 2-1b, 1 RBI; Austin Davis 2b, 1r, 1 RBI, Johnson Central.

 

 

 

SOFTBALL

 

Belfry………..............................8

 

Pike Central…..........................6

 

LOUISA — Belfry’s Taylor Maynard tripled home a pair of runs in the first inning and then tripled home three in the sixth to rally the Lady Pirates to an 8-6 win over Pike County Central in the opening round of the 60th District tournament played on May 22.

 

Maynard also added an RBI grounder to shortstop as Belfry improved to 21-12. She finished with six RBI.

 

Autumn Cox had a two-run single in the fourth and added an RBI single in the fourth to help the Lady Hawks grab a 5-3.

 

Kailee Rash was the winning pitcher while Haley Howell took the loss as PCC’s season ends at 17-13.

 

 

 

At Louisa

 

(60th District tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

PC (17-13)…...........................000 302 1 – 6-8-0

 

BF (21-12)…...........................200 105 x – 8-9-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Kailee Rash

 

LP – Haley Howell

 

Hitting: Autumn Cox 2-1b, 1r, 3 RBI, Pike Central; Taylor Maynard 2-3b, 6 RBI, Belfry.

 

 

 

South Floyd…..........................16

 

Prestonsburg…......................…1

 

STONECREST — South Floyd advanced to the championship game of the 58th District tournament with a 16-1 win over Prestonsburg in the opening round game played on May 22.

 

Cheyenne Light and Kaylee Moore knocked in a pair of runs each while Brooke Stumbo, Kassedy Osborne, Melaine Osborne had one hit each.

 

Katie Moore was the winning pitcher while Megan Music took the loss.

 

South Floyd improved to 8-13 while Prestonsburg’s season ends at 3-19.

 

 

 

At StoneCrest

 

(58th District tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

PB (3-19)….......................................100 – 1-0-6

 

SF (8-13)….......................................079 – 16-5-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Katie Moore

 

LP – Megan Music

 

Hitting: Cheyenne Light 2 RBI; Kaylee Moore 2 RBI, South Floyd.

 

 

 

Johnson Central…...................10

 

Paintsville………....................…0

 

PAINTSVILLE — Johnson Central’s Micailyn Pierce tossed a no-hitter as the Lady Eagles rolled to a 10-0 win over Paintsville in the opening round of the 57th District tournament played on May 22.

 

Alaina Castle had two hits and drove in five runs as JC improved to 14-9 while advancing to the championship game.

 

Macy Daniel collected three hits and Annie Vanhoose added two. Pierce added a pair of RBI.

 

Anna Keeton suffered the loss as Paintsville’s season ends at 25-12.

 

Johnson Central will face Magoffin County in the finals. Both advance to regional play.

 

 

 

At Paintsville

 

(57th District tournament)

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

PV (25-12)….............................000 00 – 0- 0-1

 

JC (14-9)…................................132 04 – 10-13-2

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Micailyn Pierce

 

LP – Anna Keeton

 

Hitting: Alaina Castle 2h, 5 RBI; Macy Daniel 3h; Annie Vanhoose 2h; Micailyn Pierce 2 RBI, Johnson Central.

DISTRICT ACTION: Belfry’s Matt Fought attempts to put down a bunt against Lawrence County in the opening round of the 60th District tournament on May 22. Below, pitcher Avery Browning delivers a pitch. Belfry fell, 7-1.
Medical Leader | Photos by TEDDY PAYNTER
Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, May 26, 2017

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