The Leonard Lawson Cancer Center (LLCC) at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) acknowledges March as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

 

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the US and the second leading cause in men.

 

The death rate for colorectal cancer has been dropping in both men and women for several decades.  There are a number of likely reasons for this change. 

 

One is that colorectal polyps are now being found more often by screening and removed before they can develop into cancers or are being found earlier when the disease is easier to treat. Treatment has also improved over the last few decades resulting in more than one million survivors of colorectal cancer in the US.

 

“If the patient can be operated on, surgery can get most, if not all, of the cancer,” said PMC Oncologist Gayle Roberts, MD. “This depends on the size of the tumor and how many lymph nodes test positive.”

 

If you have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, your cancer care team will discuss treatment options with you. There are several ways to treat colorectal cancer, depending on its type and stage.

 

“Colon Cancer has a fair prognosis depending on the size of the tumor and progression of the disease,” said Dr. Roberts.  “Sometimes surgery alone is enough. When there is a risk of cancer affecting the entire intestinal tract, chemotherapy is necessary to rid the body of the cancer.”

 

Dr. Roberts encourages patients to always focus on healthy life choices.

 

“Smoking is one of the biggest causative cofactors of colon cancer,” he said. “After diagnosis, it is never too late to change your habits. A good diet, exercise and stopping tobacco consumption are ways to minimize risk.”

 

For additional information about colorectal cancer or to schedule an appointment call the Leonard Lawson Cancer Center at 606-218-2212.

 

 

 

Source: American Cancer Society

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, March 17, 2017

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) proudly announces the addition of Hospital Medicine Physician Megan Copley-Harris, DO.

 

Dr. Copley-Harris received her bachelor of science in biology from Georgetown College and her medical degree from Pikeville College School of Osteopathic medicine.

 

“I always had an interest in the human body and how it worked. I knew at an early age I wanted to practice medicine and pursue my dream of taking care of people,” she said.

 

She grew up in Martin County and is the daughter of a coal miner.

 

“I grew up knowing this area needed doctors and I knew I wanted to practice medicine in this area,” she said.

 

She looks forward to providing care to the people in this area.

 

“My goals are to treat patients like I would treat my own family by providing quality care for them and communicating with their families,” she said.

 

Several factors drew her to PMC

 

“I chose PMC for a few different reasons,” she said. “I wanted to provide care to people of eastern Kentucky. PMC is a great environment to work in. I have such a wonderful relationship with the staff here. PMC offers many specialties for patients to receive quality care,” she said.

 

When she’s not caring for patients, Dr. Copley-Harris enjoys spending time with her husband, Lee and their son Ronan. As a family, they enjoy traveling and taking vacations and making family memories.

Author Name: 
Amanda Jo Lawson
Friday, March 17, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Pikeville High School senior Ryan Crum, son of Dr. Aaron and Angela Crum, has earned one of only 150 Coca Cola Scholars Program scholarships worth $20,000.

 

The Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship is an achievement-based scholarship awarded to graduating high school seniors.

 

Students are recognized for their capacity to lead and serve, as well as their commitment to making a significant impact on their schools and communities.

 

With the 28th class in 2016, the Foundation has provided over 5,700 Coca-Cola Scholars with more than $60 million in educational support. 150 Coca-Cola Scholars are selected each year to receive this $20,000 scholarship.

 

Reaching this level distinguishes these students as extraordinary leaders in their school and community.

 

Nearly 86,000 applicants and more than 1,900 Semifinalists participated in the program across the nation.

 

Regional Finalists then participated in the next phase of the selection process, a 20-minute interview with a Regional Interview Committee, comprised of a Foundation staff member and previous Coca-Cola Scholars Program scholarship recipients.

 

After these interviews, 150 students were named Coca-Cola Scholars and received a $20,000 college scholarship.

 

These 150 Coca-Cola Scholars will attend the 2017 Scholars Weekend April 20-23, 2017, where they will meet their peers for a time of inspiration, fun, and camaraderie. Scholars will be honored at the 29th annual Scholars Banquet and participate in a Leadership Development Institute, an intensive leadership training during Scholars Weekend that challenges them to develop an inside-out leadership philosophy.

 

The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation supports more than 1,400 college students each year, with prestigious annual scholarships of $3.4 million through two nationally recognized programs on behalf of the Coca-Cola System.

 

 

Ryan Crum
Friday, March 17, 2017

LEXINGTON — Perry County Central opened the second half on an 8-0 run and pulled away to beat cold-shooting Pikeville, 61-46, in the opening round of the Boys’ Sweet 16 tournament played at Rupp Arena on March 15.

 

The Panthers, who finished the year at 23-9, hit just 16-of-52 shots from the floor for 30 percent and were soundly beaten on the boards by a 44-21 margin by the much taller Commodores.

 

Cade Byers led the Panthers in scoring with eight points while Wyatt Battaile chipped in seven.

 

Byers jumper with 4 minutes, 1 second left before halftime gave Pikeville its final lead of the game at 14-12.

 

Princewell Anosike led the Commodores, now 28-7, with 10 points, 15 rebounds and six blocked shots.

 

Damon Tobler and Austin Hill paced the scoring with 12 points apiece. Idris Akenyemi chipped in 10.

 

Pikeville was playing in its first state tournament since 1999.

 

 

 

At Lexington

 

(Sweet 16)

 

SCORE BY QUARTERS:

 

PC (28-7)........................................................8 15 17 21 - 61

 

PK (23-9)........................................................9 11 7 19 - 46

 

Scoring:

 

Perry County Central (61) - Damon Tobler 3(1) 3-7 12; Idris Akenyemi 5 0-0 10; Noah Back 0(3) 0-0 9; Austin Hill 6 0-0 12; Princewell Anosike 4 2-5 10; Chandler Caudill 2 0-1 4; Jacob Woolum 1 0-0 2; and Noah Caudill 0 2-2 2. Totals: 21(4) 7-15 61.

 

Pikeville (46) - Kyle Watkins 1 2-2 4; Wyatt Battaile 1(1) 2-5 7; Evan Rhodes 3 0-0 6; Connor Roberts 1(1) 0-0 5; Cade Byers 4 0-1 8; Jose Childers 0(1) 0-0 3; Grayson Harris 0 2-2 2; Connor Risner 1 3-4 5; Kobe Brown 0 2-2 2; and Zach Hamilton 2 0-1 4. Totals: 13(3) 11-17 46.

 

Next up: Pikeville’s season ends at 23-9.

Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, March 17, 2017

ROBINSON CREEK — Shelby Valley made the most of four hits as the Wildcats opened the season with an 11-1 win over Ridgeview (Va.) in a game played at Dale Trivette Field on March 13.

 

Ty Riddle singled, scored and drove in two runs to back the pitching of winner Jacob Beverly.

 

Seth Bailey walked three times and scored three runs while Austin Rhodes singled, scored and added an RBI.

 

Beverly stuck out 10 batters and scattered three hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Robinson Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

RG (0-1)…..................................100 00 – 1-3-2

 

SV (1-0)…...................................011 54 – 11-4-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Jacob Beverly

 

LP –

 

Hitting: Ty Riddle 1b, 1r, 2 RBI; Seth Bailey 3-bb, 3r; Austin Rhodes 1b, 1r, 1 RBI, Shelby Valley.

 

 

 

Pike Central…….......................5

 

Sheldon Clark…........................2

 

BUCKLEYS CREEK — Pike Central’s Brice Elkins had two hits and Evan Coleman doubled and drove in a pair of runs to lead the Hawks to a 5-2 win over Sheldon Clark in a game played at the Hawks Nest on March 13.

 

Ryan Eads was the winning pitcher with relief help from Seth Conn, who had one hit and drove in one run.

 

Ethan Osborne took the loss for Sheldon Clark.

 

 

 

At Buckleys Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

SC (0-1)…...............................000 100 1 – 2-2-3

 

PC (1-1)…..............................111 002 x – 5-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Ryan Eads

 

LP – Ethan Osborne

 

Hitting: Evan Coleman 2b. 2 RBI; Brice Elkins 2-1b, 2r; Austin Smith 2r; Seth Conn 1b, 1 RBI, Pike Central.

 

 

 

North Laurel…..........................8

 

Letcher Central......................…4

 

ERMINE — Letcher Central fell behind early on to North Laurel and the Cougars came up short in an 8-4 loss on March 11.

 

Keaston Maggard drove in three runs for the Cougars and teammate Jake Slone added three hits in the season-opening loss.

 

John Potter took the loss.

 

Alex Binder had three hits to back the pitching of winner Jared Gay.

 

 

 

At Ermine

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

NL (1-0)…............................221 102 0 – 8-11-0

 

LC (0-1).............................…000 400 0 – 4-12-3

 

By TEDDY PAYNTER

 

Staff Writer

 

 

 

ROBINSON CREEK — Shelby Valley made the most of four hits as the Wildcats opened the season with an 11-1 win over Ridgeview (Va.) in a game played at Dale Trivette Field on March 13.

 

Ty Riddle singled, scored and drove in two runs to back the pitching of winner Jacob Beverly.

 

Seth Bailey walked three times and scored three runs while Austin Rhodes singled, scored and added an RBI.

 

Beverly stuck out 10 batters and scattered three hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Robinson Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

RG (0-1)…..................................100 00 – 1-3-2

 

SV (1-0)…...................................011 54 – 11-4-1

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Jacob Beverly

 

LP –

 

Hitting: Ty Riddle 1b, 1r, 2 RBI; Seth Bailey 3-bb, 3r; Austin Rhodes 1b, 1r, 1 RBI, Shelby Valley.

 

 

 

Pike Central…….......................5

 

Sheldon Clark…........................2

 

BUCKLEYS CREEK — Pike Central’s Brice Elkins had two hits and Evan Coleman doubled and drove in a pair of runs to lead the Hawks to a 5-2 win over Sheldon Clark in a game played at the Hawks Nest on March 13.

 

Ryan Eads was the winning pitcher with relief help from Seth Conn, who had one hit and drove in one run.

 

Ethan Osborne took the loss for Sheldon Clark.

 

 

 

At Buckleys Creek

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

SC (0-1)…...............................000 100 1 – 2-2-3

 

PC (1-1)…..............................111 002 x – 5-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Ryan Eads

 

LP – Ethan Osborne

 

Hitting: Evan Coleman 2b. 2 RBI; Brice Elkins 2-1b, 2r; Austin Smith 2r; Seth Conn 1b, 1 RBI, Pike Central.

 

 

 

North Laurel…..........................8

 

Letcher Central......................…4

 

ERMINE — Letcher Central fell behind early on to North Laurel and the Cougars came up short in an 8-4 loss on March 11.

 

Keaston Maggard drove in three runs for the Cougars and teammate Jake Slone added three hits in the season-opening loss.

 

John Potter took the loss.

 

Alex Binder had three hits to back the pitching of winner Jared Gay.

 

 

 

At Ermine

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

NL (1-0)…............................221 102 0 – 8-11-0

 

LC (0-1).............................…000 400 0 – 4-12-3

 

Phelps in the season opener for both teams on March 9.

 

Hayden Fleming and Coty Wright each added an RBI to back the pitching of winner Mathew Jessey.

 

 

 

At Phelps

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

JK (1-0)…...............................000 220 0 – 4-4-3

 

PH (0-1)…..............................100 200 0 – 3-2-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Matthew Jessey

 

LP – Dylan New

 

Hitting: Josh Delph 1h, 2 RBI; Coty Wright 1h, 1 RBI; Hayden Fleming 1 RBI, Jenkins.

 

 

 

Pikeville………..........................2

 

Paintsville……….......................1

 

PIKEVILLE — Winning pitcher Peyton Hamilton scored on a wild pitch and second baseman Andrew McNamee knocked home the game-winning run on a fielder’s choice as Pikeville edged Paintsville, 2-1, in the season opener played at Davis Park on March 8.

 

Jonathon McKenzie took the loss despite allowing only one hit.

 

Hamilton scattered four hits over five innings.

 

 

 

At Pikeville

 

SCORE BY INNINGS: R-H-E

 

PV (0-1)…..............................100 000 0 – 1-5-0

 

PK (1-0)…..............................200 000 x – 2-4-0

 

Pitching:

 

WP – Peyton Hamilton

 

LP – Jonathon McKenzie

 

Hitting: Matt Baldwin 2b; Seth Williams 1b, 1r; Jonathon McKenzie 1b, 1 RBI, Paintsville. Andrew McNamee 2b, 1b, 1 RBI; Peyton Hamilton 1b, 1r, Pikeville.

OPENING DAY: Paintsville catcher Chase Meade blocks a pitch in the dirt to Pikeville’s Andrew McNamee during a game played at Davis Park on March. 8. McNamee had two hits and drove in the game-winning run as the Panthers edged the Tigers, 2-1.
Medical Leader│Photo by TEDDY PAYNTER
Author Name: 
Teddy Paynter
Friday, March 17, 2017

Patricia Gaye “Patty” Maynard, 79, of Hatfield, died March 7. Funeral, March 10. Burial, Stepp Cemetery.

 

Ivan E. Blackburn, 88, of Pikeville, died March 8. He was a U.S. Army Veteran. Funeral, March 13 at Zebulon Church of Christ. Burial, Mountain View Memory Gardens, Huddy.

 

Margaret Helen Smith, 69, of Sidney, died March 8. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Mountain View Memory Gardens, Huddy.

 

Elder Bobby G. Scott Sr., 77, of Hardy, died March 9. He was a U.S. Army veteran having served as an MP. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Bobby Scott Cemetery.

 

Sidney Ward Sipple, 67, of Dandridge, Tenn., died March 5. He was a U.S. Army veteran having served in the Vietnam Era. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Sipple Cemetery at Beech Creek, W.Va.

 

Ralph Martin, 85, of Garrett, died March 8. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Martin Cemetery.

 

Dennis “Dick” Goble, 56, of Dwale, died March 10. Funeral, March 14. Burial, Goble Cemetery.

 

Hazel Layne Hicks, 98, of Dema, died March 13. Funeral, March 15. Burial, Hicks Cemetery.

 

Pauline Sparks Wells, 84, of Prestonsburg, died March 12. Funeral, March 16. Burial, Highland Memorial Park, Staffordsville.

 

Brandon Dock Colley, 39, of Morristown, Tenn., died March 6. Funeral, March 9 at Bowling Fork Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Family Cemetery, Hellier.

 

Marie Lester, 90, of Elkhorn City, died March 12. Funeral, March 15. Burial, JU Thacker Mausoleum, Shelbiana.

 

James Earl Moore, 69, of Langley, died March 6. Funeral, March 9. Burial, Moore Family Cemetery.

 

Earnest M. Wallen, 56, of Martin, died March 10. Funeral, March 14. Burial, Martin Cemetery.

 

Herman France, 87, of Rogersville, Tenn., died March 8. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Roberts France Cemetery.

 

D.M. Adkins, 64, of Kimper, died March 9. Funeral, March 13. Burial, Coleman Family Cemetery.

 

Enola Gay Allen, 61, of Harold, died March 12. Funeral, March 16. Burial, Salisbury Family Cemetery, Toler.

 

Lincinda “Cinda” Case Kidd, 90, of Pikeville, died March 9. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Kidd Family Cemetery.

 

Virgil Thacker, 92, of Pikeville, died March 13. Funeral, March 15. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery.

 

William Harrison Adkins, 74, of Hurricane Rd., died March 12. Funeral, March 16. Burial, Mack Adkins Cemetery.

 

Malta Josephine May, 79, of Pikeville, died March 10. Private family funeral.

 

Anita Fitch, 56, of Pikeville, died Feb. 23. Funeral, March 18 at Jubilee Christian Assembly of God, Shelbiana.

 

David Robinette, 46, of Varney, died March 13. Funeral, March 18 at Pilgrim Home Old Regular Baptist. Burial, Robinette Family Cemetery.

 

Clayton Slone, 67, of Raccoon, died March 11. Funeral, March 13. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery, Pikeville.

 

Jimpy Thacker, 71, of Winchester, died March 12. Funeral, March 17. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery, Pikeville.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Braydon Ray Endicott, son of Kimberly Wright and Billy Endicott, born Feb. 27; weight: 7lbs. 6oz.

 

Lilly Elizabeth Slone, daughter of Lesley Thornsberry and Brian Slone, born Feb. 28; weight: 7lbs., 14oz.

 

Kassidy Rae Ann Green, daughter of Jessica and Larry Green, born Feb. 28; weight: 4lbs., 6oz.

 

Easton Zachery Tate Shepherd, son of Amy and Zachery Shepherd, born March 1; weight: 8lbs.

 

RaeLynn Grace Meadows, daughter of Shaley Meadows, born March 2; weight: 5lbs., 3oz.

 

Benjamin Ryder Staggs, son of Hannah and Zachery Staggs, born March 3; weight: 8lbs.

 

Willow Ernestine Bailey, daughter of Jessica Childress and Joshua Bailey, born March 3; weight: 8lbs., 4oz.

 

Ian Conor Chaney, son of Rebeca and John Chaney II, born March 4; weight: 6lbs., 14.9oz.

 

Emma Paige Rosaleigh Conn, daughter of Ashley Gross and Jimmy Conn, born March 4; weight: 6lbs., 8oz.

 

Felix Greyson Reynolds, son of Crystal and Randy Reynolds Jr., born March 4; weight: 7lbs., 5oz.

 

Madeline Paige Brooke Scarberry, daughter of Brooke and Rodney Scarberry, born March 4; weight: 6lbs., 4oz.

 

Bailey Rylyn Elizabeth Stevens, daughter of Katelyn Johnson and Ryan Stevens, born March 4; weight: 7lbs., 13oz.

 

Brystol Jayde Daniels, daughter of Kayla and Raymond Daniels, born March 5; weight: 7lbs., 14oz.

 

Carter Layne Walters, son of Samantha Hall and Charles Walters, born March 5; weight: 7lbs., 3 oz.

 

Owen Kennix Howell, son of Christan Salisbury and Zachary Howell, born March 7; weight: 7lbs., 4oz.

 

Jaelynn Nicole Hurley, daughter of Shellie and Jason Hurley, born March 7; weight: 7lbs., 2.4oz.

 

Madelyn Rose McCoy, daughter of Miranda and Timothy McCoy, born March 8; weight: 6lbs., 11 oz.

 

Sadye Lakaye Morris, daughter of Brittany Dawn Bailey and Gregory Allen Morris, born March 8; weight: 8lbs., 8oz.

 

Skyler Jade Bowens, daughter of Angelia and Dustin Bowens, born March 8; weight: 6lbs., 13oz.

 

Carter James Case, son of Talisa and James Case, born March 9; weight: 6lbs., 9oz.

 

Sawyer Landon Collins, son of Tiffani and Michael Collins, born March

Friday, March 17, 2017

The Wound Care Center at Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) specializes in the treatment of hard-to-heal or complicated wounds which, if they do not improve, may lead to serious complications.

 

Randall Stanley of Belfry learned first-hand of the Wound Care Center after developing a wound in his mouth.

 

Stanley was diagnosed with oral cancer in August 2016 and underwent surgery and radiation treatments within two months. Although the radiation therapy killed the cancer cells, it also left an open wound in his jaw.

 

This condition is known as osteoradionecrosis. Essentially, the radiation destroyed some of the very small blood vessels within the bone.

 

“The radiation therapy damaged some of the teeth and bone in my mouth,” said Stanley. “I had an open wound in my jaw that I could not see but was very painful.”

 

Stanley’s oncologist referred him to the PMC Wound Care Center, which treats osteoradionecrosis with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT).

 

HBOT is a medical treatment which enhances the body’s natural healing process. Patients breathe 100 percent oxygen in a total body chamber where atmospheric pressure is controlled. This therapy has long been used as a treatment for decompression sickness, a hazard of scuba diving, and has evolved to treat other conditions that resist healing.

 

“I had 20 treatments,” said Stanley. “Then I took a break to have some dental work done, then 10 more treatments. Now, the wound is completely healed and the skin has grown back over the bone.”

 

Stanley’s oncologist was well pleased with the results.

 

“It’s been a good experience,” added Stanley. “The staff is very friendly and knowledgeable and will help in any way they can. They know what they are doing.”

 

The PMC Wound Care Center is staffed by professionals who are certified in wound care. Staff physicians include Dr. John Fleming, medical director, Dr. Tim Wright, surgeon and Dr. Molly Meier, podiatrist. David Thacker serves as the HBOT Safety Director and has completed training and certification in this field.

 

Other members of the Wound Care Center staff are Marla Schafstall, scribe, Craig Staton, Wound Care tech, Tabbetha Fleming, certified medical assistant, Amberly Johnson, RN, case manager, Kayla Tackett, RN, case manager, Jenna Osborne, RN and Tonya Newsome Goble, RN, BSN, Clinical Manager

 

For information on the Wound Care Center, call 606-218-4721.

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, March 10, 2017

PIKEVILLE — Earlier this year the American Optometric Association (AOA) announced the creation of a surgical curriculum project team consisting of some of the most accomplished clinicians and educators from around the United States. The University of Pikeville-Kentucky College of Optometry (KYCO) is proud to announce founding faculty member, Gregory S. Moore, O.D., was nominated and has accepted his nomination by the AOA board of directors to be a part of this team.

 

Moore has extensive clinical experience and is licensed to practice optometry in West Virginia, South Carolina and Kentucky as well as being certified by the Kentucky board of optometry to perform laser surgical procedures.

 

“I have no doubt that my inclusion on this historic surgical curriculum project team the AOA has developed is a direct result of the efforts being put forth by the amazing faculty we have assembled here at KYCO to revolutionize optometric education,” said Moore. “I am quite certain what we are doing here will be a large part of the results of the curriculum change this project team will eventually recommend.”

 

“Dr. Moore is one of the principle architects of the extensive optometric primary care surgical curriculum,” said Andrew Buzzelli, O.D., M.S., vice president for optometric education at the University of Pikeville and founding dean of KYCO. “He is one of our many faculty designing the Kentucky College of Optometry curriculum for the contemporary practice of optometry. The AOA has added a true expert in the field to their committee.”

 

A native to the Appalachian region, Moore graduated from West Virginia State University with a bachelor of science degree in biology and then received a doctor of optometry degree from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis. He has a vast base of practice experiences ranging from serving as optometrist for the Chicago Cubs Professional Baseball Organization Inc., to owning and working as clinical director of the West Virginia Laser Eye Center LLC. Along with four ophthalmologists in two locations in West Virginia and one in Kentucky, Moore provided peri-operative care for LASIK as well as premium intra-ocular lens implants for cataract surgical patients through the West Virginia Laser Eye Center LLC.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Invasive colorectal cancer is a preventable disease. Early detection is the most important factor in the recent decline of colorectal cancer.

 

The American Cancer Society estimates that 95,520 new cases of colon cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2017 and nine out of 10 colon cancers may be prevented or cured with regular checks.

 

 “Colorectal cancer is a multifactorial disease process,” said PMC Colorectal Surgeon Jasneet Singh Bhullar, MD. “Risk factors include environmental exposures, lifestyle choices, inflammatory bowel disease and genetics.”

 

 The colon and rectum are parts of the digestive system. Colon cancer begins when abnormal cells grow inside the colon or rectum. The cancer often begins as a small growth called a polyp. Polyps are not cancer, but they can turn into cancer over time.  Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in Ky.

 

Dr. Bhullar says colon cancer is often detected during screening procedures. Other common clinical presentations include iron-deficiency anemia, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, change in bowel habits and intestinal obstruction or perforation.

 

“Screening for colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps should start at age 50 in asymptomatic men and women,” said Dr. Bhullar. “Because there are generally no symptoms for colon cancer, it is important to have regular cancer screenings, eat a healthy diet, exercise, maintain a healthy weight and do not smoke.”

 

He says screening for colorectal cancer should start at an earlier age and be more frequent and more stringent for individuals who carry an increased or high risk of developing colorectal cancer.

 

 “Persons with a prior history of polyps or colorectal cancer, a family history of colon cancer or history of inflammatory bowel diseases are those who are considered increased risk or high risk patients.” said Dr. Bhullar.

 

When the disease is more advanced, common symptoms include blood in the stool, a change in bowel habits, cramps, weight loss, a tired feeling and nausea. Often these problems are caused by other health conditions.  People with these symptoms should see their physician.

 

For additional information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Bhullar call 606-218-2202.

 

Source: Kentucky Cancer Program

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, March 10, 2017

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