Pikeville Medical Center’s (PMC) Trauma Department will be offering free classes to the general public during national Stop the Bleed Day on March 31.

PMC has spent a number of months implementing the campaign by bringing awareness to the numerous trauma incidents and ways individuals can prevent them from occurring.

The classes are a way for community members to become more educated and prepared in case of an emergency.

The nationwide campaign is designed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to empower individuals to act quickly and save lives. 

The program is aimed to provide training for everyone on how to respond if bleeding was to take place and what needs to be done to help save lives.

“We are taking this opportunity to educate and help people become more aware of traumatic injuries with the implementation of Stop the Bleed, as well as taking the opportunity to express the importance of safety,” PMC Injury Prevention Coordinator Angie Reed said.

Traumatic injuries account for over 41 million emergency department visits annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

“A part of PMC’s mission is to provide quality care,” PMC Trauma Data Coordinator Olivia Akers said. “This campaign is part of our outreach to the community to educate and train people in the region as the first line of defense.”

PMC is the only Level II trauma center in Kentucky and is verified by the American College of Surgeons. The trauma team is comprised of trauma surgeons, a number of specialty physicians and staff who stand ready 24/7 to treat traumatic injuries.

Free classes will be available on March 31 at the Pam May Clinic building at 10 a.m. 

Classes will be from 10 am. until noon and from 1 until 3 p .m.

For more information about trauma prevention at PMC’s Trauma Center, call 606-218-6334.

Author Name: 
Amanda Jo Lawson
Friday, March 23, 2018

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) invites everyone to attend this year’s annual Holy Week and Easter Sunrise Services. We will kick off the week on Sunday, March 25 with Palm Sunday Service and will continue with special services through Sunday, April 1.

Holy Week Services will be held Monday, March 26 through Friday March 30 and will be held in the hospital chapel, located on the second floor of the May Tower, from 10:30 a.m. until 11 a.m.  The speakers will be Brad Williamson, Kaminski Robinson, Larry Penix, Glen Slone and Stacy Stepp.  Special music will be provided by Courtney Hayton, The PMC Rehab Band, Joshua Slone and Christy Roberts.

 PMC Director of Spiritual Activities, Jane Robinson said, “Each year we are blessed to have our staff participate in the Holy Week Services. This is a perfect way for us to share our Christian mission.”

Communion will be available in the hospital chapel throughout the week.

The Easter Sunrise Service will be held on Sunday, April 1 and will begin at 7 a.m. on the 10th floor parking garage.

 The service will be led by Mike Harrison, Pastor at First Christian Church and special music will be provided by Alison Lovely.

PMC Director of Chaplain Services, Randy Johnson said, “We try to bring in a speaker who many people may not have heard and this year we have asked the new pastor from the First Christian Church on Chloe. Mike Harrison has been a friend of mine for almost 30 years. You are in for a real treat, I can assure you of that.”

Continental breakfast/refreshments will be provided immediately following the Sunrise Service. 

For those who are unable to attend, services will air live on all East Kentucky Broadcasting stations and EKB-TV. For those who may not have been able to attend or watch the live program, we will re-broadcast the program on EKB-TV Sunday at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

In case of inclement weather, the service will be held in the PMC 10th floor clinic.

For additional information regarding Easter services or to contact PMC Chaplain Services call 606-218-3969.

Author Name: 
Carol Casebolt
Friday, March 23, 2018

 

As we age, maintaining a healthy weight may become more difficult.  According to Mayo Clinic, muscle mass decreases and fat replaces it starting around age 30. Since fat burns fewer calories than muscle does, the body needs fewer calories to maintain its current weight.

Pikeville Medical Center’s (PMC) Director of Safety Management Mary B. Combs found that to be true. As time went by, Combs picked up extra pounds until she realized she had to take some action.

“I’m getting older,” said Combs. “If I don’t lose the weight now, when am I going to do it?”

Combs joined the HMR weight loss program offered at PMC in January 2017. She completed one year of Phase I, and lost of average of two pounds per week for a total of 100 pounds and dropped five dress sizes.

“I set my mind to doing the diet and I stuck with it,” said Combs.

Phase I of the HMR program is designed to get weight off quickly. Participants choose two pre-packaged entrees, five servings of fruits and vegetables and they have three choices of a shake, soup or cereal each day.

The shakes are the cornerstone of the weight-loss program and are used instead of high calorie snacks to control hunger.

“The shakes were my favorite,” added Combs. “I mixed the vanilla shake with strawberries for a strawberry shake but mostly I just made the chocolate shakes because I love chocolate.”

Because the HMR program is designed with long-term weight maintenance in mind, participants are strongly encouraged to exercise and make it an integral part of a new lifestyle.

Combs transformed her mostly sedentary lifestyle to one where she exercises six days per week.

“I was having knee pain and facing surgery which made exercise difficult at first. But the more I exercised, the better I felt. Because of the weight that I have lost, I no longer have the knee pain and do not have to have knee surgery.”

The final component of the HMR program is the meetings and coaching. Participants must attend a weekly meeting which is led by a trained HMR coach.

“I enjoyed the meetings and got a lot of good ideas there,” added Combs. “There were samples of new recipes at each meeting, we talked about what everyone was doing for exercise, and discussed how to stay on the diet when traveling.”

Combs has reached her weight loss goal but has not quit the HMR program.

 “I’m in my second session of Phase II, which is the maintenance part of the program,” said Combs. “It teaches you how to make healthy food choices and control portion size. I’m learning new things at every class.”

With a new grandchild on the way and retirement to look forward to, Combs has no plans to put the weight back on.

“My family is so proud of me and has been a big support,” added Combs. “I’m looking forward to spending time with the baby and being active with my family.”

For more information on the HMR weight loss program, contact the PMC Wellness and Weight Loss Center at 606-218- 2205.

Author Name: 
Kathy Atkins
Friday, March 23, 2018

Gary Dee Bays, 62, of Prestonsburg, passed March 16. Funeral, March 22. Burial, Conley Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

Robert Lee Prater, 71, of Hueysville, passed away March 16. Funeral, March 20. Burial, Prater Family Cemetery, Hueysville.

Franceen Hicks Crum, 70, of Martin, passed away March 16. Funeral, March 20. Burial, Robinson Family Cemetery.

Lou Ellen Frasure, 79, of Grethel, passed away March 15. Funeral, March 18. Burial, Reynolds Family Cemetery, Grethel.

Robert Earl “Bobcat” Jackson, 72, of Georgetown, formerly of Wheelwright, passed away March 9. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, having served during the Vietnam War. He was an assistant coach for Wheelwright and South Floyd High Schools. Funeral, March 16, Faithway Mission Baptist Church, Zion Hill in Midway. Burial, Camp Nelson National Cemetery, Nicholasville.

Michael Douglas Burkett, 46, of Prestonsburg, passed away March 8. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Weddington Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

Ricky Dane “Ranger Rick” Caudill, 54, of Eastern, passed away March 7. He was a DJ for WMDJ radio for over 30 years. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Lackey Cemetery, Lackey.

Mae Caudill, 98, of Topmost, passed away March 7. Funeral, March 10. Burial, Rene Hall Cemetery, Topmost.

Kenneth L. Bowers, 73, of McCarr, passed away March 17. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, having served during the Vietnam War. Funeral, March 22. Burial, Pinson Cemetery, Buskirk.

Phillip Reed Gooslin, 72, of Matewan, W.Va., passed away March 9. The body has been cremated.

Charles Dean Jones, 51, of Caney Little Fork, passed away March 18. Funeral, March 22. Memorial service, March 31, Raven Rock Clubhouse.

Geneva Diles, 64, of Greasy Creek, passed away March 13. Funeral, March 16, Greasy Creek Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Adkins Cemetery, Shelbiana.

Patty Louise Thompson, 64, of Bartley Hollow, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 13, Long Fork Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Thompson Cemetery, Pikeville.

Judy Hall, 76, of Left Fork of Long Fork, Virgie, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Hall Family Cemetery.

Nikolai Gage Necessary, infant son of Cody and Alyssa Necessary of Langley, passed away March 18. Graveside services, March 21, Harry Lee Moore Cemetery, Garrett.

Madeline Case Clark, 89, of Harold, passed away March 18. Funeral, March 21. Burial, Clark Family Cemetery, Honaker.

Sharon Kaye Tackett Perkins, 66, of Martin, passed away March 15. Funeral, March 19. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

Edna Jeanette Harris, 83, of Langley, passed away March 15. Funeral, March 17. Burial, Mosley Cemetery, Cow Creek, Prestonsburg.

Wanda Gay Peters Jarrell, 95, of Galena, Ohio, formerly of Martin, passed away March 14. Funeral, March 17. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

Johnny Wright, 72 of Prestonsburg, passed away March 14. Funeral, March 17. Burial, Wright Family Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

Donna Sue Terry, 75, of Martin, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Mary Dotson Williams, 92, of Betsy Layne, passed away March 7. Funeral, March 9. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

Edith Burdell Steele, 87, of Harold, passed away March 7. Private graveside service, March 9, Steele Family Cemetery, Harold.

Judy Carol Anderson, 65, of Regina, passed away March 18. Funeral, March 24. Burial, Yellow Hill Cemetery, Regina.

Marsha Rowe, 59, of Ashcamp, passed away March 16. Funeral, March 19. Burial, Dow Brooks Cemetery, Draffin.

Kristy Jean Adkins, 39, of Rosenberg, Texas, formerly of Elkhorn City, passed away March 10. Funeral, March 17.

Edith Blair, 83, of Steele, passed away March 11. Funeral, March 15. Burial, Blair Cemetery, Steele.

Richard Dwayne Blair, 52, of Steele, passed away March 6. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Blair Cemetery, Steele.

Rush Chapman, 73, of Kimper, passed away March 18. Funeral, March 21.

Harlan Keith Ratliff, 38, of Meta, passed away March 17. Funeral, March 21. Burial, Moore Cemetery, Shelby Gap.

Ernie Eugene Stepp, 66, of Petersburg, Ind., formerly of Pike County, passed away March 14. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran. Funeral, March 19. Burial, Bentridge Cemetery, Meta.

Beverly R. Holmes, 45, of Tipton, Ind., formerly of Pikeville, passed away Feb. 24. Memorial service, March 11.

Irene B. Kendrick, 90, of Raccoon, passed away March 8. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Kendrick Family Cemetery, Raccoon.

Claude Montgomery, 71, of Williamson, W.Va., passed away March 19. Memorial service, March 23, Chattatory Church of God.

Betty Ethel Smith, 82, of Ransom, passed away March 12. Funeral, March 15. Burial, Phillip Smith Family Cemetery.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Jasper Darrel Damron, son of Savannah and Jason Damron, born March 15; weight: 9 lbs., 1 oz.

Jaxson Augustus Layne Hall, son of Teresa Browning and Charles Hall, born March 15; weight: 6 lbs., 4 oz.

Jeremiah James Stevens, son of Joann Chambers and James Stevens, born March 14; weight: 8 lbs., 1 oz.

Cambria Jade Sword, daughter of Courtney Bartley and Billy Sword Jr., born March 14; weight: 7 lbs., 12 oz.

Maddox Reed Slone, son of Santana and Gene Slone, born March 14; weight: 8 lbs., 14 oz.

Nevaeh Hope Wagner, daughter of Carlee Tackett and Austin Wagner, born March 14; weight: 8 lbs., 9.4 oz.

Cayden Ray Stewart, son of Makayla Stewart, born March 13; weight: 5 lbs., 11.2 oz.

Kiani Sage Harless, daughter of Stacia and Bobby Harless, born March 13; weight: 6 lbs., 14.1 oz.

Lycan James Maynard, son of Tamra and Zach Maynard, born March 13; weight: 7 lbs., 6.4 oz.

Walker Slade Roberts, son of Makayla and Andrew Roberts, born March 13; weight: 7 lbs.

Sara Lynn DeRossett, daughter of Jessica Thompson and Parker DeRossett II, born March 12; weight: 5 lbs, 13 oz.

Kolson Dallas Slone, son of Tia and Kyle Slone, born March 12; weight: 10 lbs., 5 oz.

Levi Gage Newsome, son of Savanna and Nathan Newsome, born March 12; weight: 7 lbs., 15 oz.

Jhett Tyler Chafin, son of Brooke and Steven Chafin, born March 11; weight: 5 lbs., 14 oz.

Ella Rose Wells, daughter of Alexis Chafin and Cameron Wells, born March 10; weight: 6 lbs., 11.8 oz.

Brantley Cole White, son of Marie and Timothy White, born March 11; weight: 6 lbs.

Grayden Reece Potter, son of Cheyenne and Randy Potter, born March 9; weight: 7 lbs., 6.2 oz.

Addyson Lee Coleman, daughter of Jennifer and Jonathan Coleman, born March 9; weight: 7 lbs., 0.8 oz.

Sadie Kaye Hamilton, daughter of Tiffany and Larry Hamilton, born March 9; weight: 5 lbs., 10 oz.

Jett Dawson Gooslin, son of Courtney and Jody Gooslin, born March 9; weight: 7 lbs., 10 oz.

Brynlee Klaire Crace, daughter of Ashley and Cameron Crace, born March 9; weight: 7 lbs., 8.5 oz.

Jonah Warren Slone, son of Lyndsey and Adam Slone, born March 8; weight: 8 lbs., 9 oz.

Friday, March 23, 2018

SOMBER HOMECOMING: Community, family, friends and fellow officers lined Hambley Boulevard to welcome home fallen Pikeville Police Officer Scotty Hamilton, who was killed in the line of duty on March 13. His body was returned to Pike County and taken to J.W. Call Funeral Home in Pikeville on March 14 from Frankfort. The slain officer’s body was escorted by fellow department members, Pikeville Fire Department, Pike County Sherrif’s officers and Kentucky State Police. Officer Hamilton was a 12-year veteran of the department.

Medical Leader│Photos by TEDDY PAYNTER
Friday, March 16, 2018

Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) proudly announces the addition of Maryam Khawari, M.D., rheumatologist.

Dr. Khawari received her medical degree from Dow Medical College in Karachi, Pakistan.

She is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in rheumatology.

Dr. Khawari says patients can expect her to be dedicated, giving them long-term care.

“Rheumatology requires long-term care and close follow-up of rare diseases, sometimes requiring complex treatments,” Dr. Khawari explained. “I chose this as my specialty because it challenges me to deal with rather uncommon diseases, where each disease is different in different patients. The diagnosis and treatments depend on critical clinical judgment.”   

Dr. Khawari considers Dr. Larry Ryan, of the Medical College of Milwaukee her most influential mentor.

“He was instrumental in inspiring the art of rheumatology,” Dr. Khawari said. “I learned, that one cannot be a good rheumatologist without being a great internist.”

She chose PMC to better serve the needs of the area.

“Rheumatological care is scarce in this region,” she explained. “PMC gives me the opportunity to meet the needs of Pike county and related regions while taking care of rheumatology patients.”

When she is not caring for patients, Dr. Khawari enjoys reading, biking, hiking, baking and cooking. She is married to Dr. Syed Hussain and together they have three beautiful children, ages nine, 10 and 13.

Author Name: 
Amy Charles
Friday, March 16, 2018

PHELPS — The economic downturn in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia has left many individuals reaching out for assistance.

Food pantries are a vital source of support to those in need and Phelps High School student Kara Stevens took it upon herself to lend a helping hand.

“Our cheerleading team had recently collected items for another blessing box located in Williamson, W.Va., and I thought our town could use one,” she said.

Stevens bought supplies to construct the blessing box and the carpentry students offered to build the box.

“This is a great project for the kids to work on,” Carpentry Instructor Don Page said. “Lots of students didn’t realize what the purpose of a blessing box was until they took part in the project.”

Page said they like to be involved in any projects they can get their hands on.

“I think the blessing box is a great thing,” he said.

Opie Harris, pastor at Church of God in Jesus Name, graciously let Stevens place the blessing box in the church’s parking lot.

BETA Club and the boys’ basketball team donated items to be placed in the blessing box. On March 9, Stevens and four basketball students filled the box with the items, in hopes of helping less fortunate families in the community.

Stevens said it’s a great feeling to see the blessing box is already off to a good start.

“It’s a wonderful feeling to give back to the community,” she said. “It helps reassure those in need that the community cares.”

Its purpose is to supply non-perishable food items and other daily necessities for anyone who needs them.

When you open the box, which is never locked, you might find crackers, soup or small household items, tissues, toilet paper and paper towels. But you also might find shampoo, toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant and soap.

The motto is simple – Take what you need, leave what you can.

“The blessing box is truly a blessing for our community,” Stevens concluded.

 

LENDING A HAND: Kara Stevens, second from right, along with four Phelps High School basketball players: Jay Casey, Keegan Bentley, Cameron Sanson and Logan Layne filled the box with the items they collected on March 9.
Medical Leader │Photos by ABIGAIL GIBSON
Author Name: 
Abigail Gibson
Friday, March 16, 2018

PIKEVILLE — In honor of check your batteries day on March 11, Pikeville Fire Department Assistant Chief Robert Lindsey provides the community with helpful tips.

“Years ago in the fire service it was realized the best way to fight fire and to prevent fire deaths and injuries was to prevent the fires themselves,” Lindsey said. “Years ago smoke detectors were developed to let people know when the smoke is actually reaching the bedrooms.”

He said putting a smoke detector prior to the bedroom is important.

“The first smoke you see is odorless and colorless, carbon monoxide travels in front of the smoke. When it gets to the point where you can see the smoke, that means it has burnt something and the smoke has gotten dirty – that’s what makes you cough,” Lindsey said.

“So if you’re in a deep sleep and carbon monoxide starts filling your room then all it’s going to do is put you into a deeper sleep. We want to know when it’s coming and the progress as it gets closer.”

He said a program they are working with now is called close before you doze.

“Close your doors. That slows down the travel of smoke and heat into sleeping quarters,” Lindsey said.

He said they recommend that every time you change your clock in the spring and fall, change the batteries in all of your smoke detectors.

“When you change a battery, use a high quality battery and write the date the battery was replaced with a permanent marker on the back,” Lindsey said.

He mentioned everyone in the household should know what your smoke detector sounds like.

“There are several different brands out there, not all of them sound the same,” Lindsey said. “Test your smoke detectors that way when it goes off everyone in your household knows what it sounds like. You should be able to stand anywhere in your house and hear it.”

Once the smoke detector goes off, Lindsey recommends families have an action plan in place.

• Roll into the floor, instead of sitting up in the bed — good air is on the bottom and bad air will be at the top.

• Crawl over and feel the door — if the door is hot, don’t open it.

• Have a second way out or stay where you are until help arrives. If you can safely leave, have everyone leave the house.

• Have a meeting area — stay at the safe spot until everyone gets there, that way you can determine if someone is missing.

• Fix a go bag — put a warm change of clothes, shoes and list of medications for everyone in the household.

“If someone has questions about the placement of smoke detectors or an action plan, they can contact their local fire department,” Lindsey said. “That’s one of the services that we provide here at Pikeville. We will come out and make recommendations.”

Author Name: 
Abigail Gibson
Friday, March 16, 2018

Glen Edward “Neich” Carroll, 64, of McAndrews, passed away March 10. Memorial service, March 15, Octavia Freewill Baptist Church.

Phillip Reed Gooslin, 72, of Matewan, W.Va., passed away March 9. The body has been cremated.

Stella Bartley Senters, 79, of Elkhorn City, passed away March 10. Funeral, March 13. Burial, Annie E. Young Cemetery, Shelbiana.

Patty Louise Thompson, 64, of Bartley Hollow, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 13, Long Fork Freewill Baptist Church. Burial, Thompson Cemetery, Pikeville.

Judy Hall, 76, of Left Fork of Long Fork, Virgie, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Hall Family Cemetery.

Beverly R. Holmes, 45, of Tipton, Ind., formerly of Pikeville, passed away Feb. 24. Memorial service, March 11.

Irene B. Kendrick, 90, of Raccoon, passed away March 8. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Kendrick Family Cemetery, Raccoon.

Donna Sue Terry, 75, of Martin, passed away March 9. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Mary Dotson Williams, 92, of Betsy Layne, passed away March 7. Funeral, March 9. Burial, Davidson Memorial Gardens, Ivel.

Edith Burdell Steele, 87, of Harold, passed away March 7. Private graveside service, March 9, Steele Family Cemetery, Harold.

Edith Blair, 83, of Steele, passed away March 11. Funeral, March 15. Burial, Blair Cemetery, Steele.

Richard Dwayne Blair, 52, of Steele, passed away March 6. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Blair Cemetery, Steele.

Robert Earl “Bobcat” Jackson, 72, of Georgetown, formerly of Wheelwright, passed away March 9. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, having served during the Vietnam War. Funeral, March 16, Faithway Mission Baptist Church, Zion Hill in Midway. Burial, Camp Nelson National Cemetery, Nicholasville.

Michael Douglas Burkett, 46, of Prestonsburg, passed away March 8. Funeral, March 12. Burial, Weddington Cemetery, Prestonsburg.

Ricky Dane “Ranger Rick” Caudill, 54, of Eastern, passed away March 7. Funeral, March 11. Burial, Lackey Cemetery, Lackey.

Mae Caudill, 98, of Topmost, passed away March 7. Funeral, March 10. Burial, Rene Hall Cemetery, Topmost.

John Paul Gooslin, 51, of McCarr, passed away March 4. His body has been cremated.

Friday, March 16, 2018

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